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realclearworld

Yes, we have no bananas

This past Friday, the most transparent presidential administration in American history went hidden behind closed doors and signed a one-year extension of the Trading with the Enemy Act that covers the US embargo of the Cuban dictatorship. For whatever the reason may be, the news of this was not made public until Monday. But what can you expect from a president that prefers to conduct business in the shadows?

The signing of this extension of TWTEA is symbolic at best, since it is congress who holds the power to lift the embargo. Nevertheless, supporters and appeasers of the Cuban dictatorship hoped that Obama would take this opportunity to send a message to the tyrannical Cuban regime that the US really, really wants to be friends with them. It did not happen, and the appeasers are very disappointed that their man in the White House squandered an opportunity to help Castro, Inc. score some legitimacy points on the world stage.

Logically, one could surmise that this symbolic move by the administration would equal a victory of sorts for the supporters of freedom and liberty in Cuba, but I do not believe that to be the case. Other than its symbolic nature, one has to consider that the extension was signed by a president who, as history has shown, can support a policy one day and forsake it the next if he deems it to be convenient. The extreme influence leftist ideology has on his decision-making is exceeded only by his desire to get what he wants. Obama has no problem sacrificing a policy in the short run (or a member of his administration, for that matter) if he thinks it will help him achieve that policy later on.

Today, Obama is for maintaining the embargo. Tomorrow? Well, that all depends.

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