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realclearworld

‘I’m watching you’

PedroarguellePayoLibre.com is reporting that former Cuban prisoner of conscience Pedro Argüelles Morán received a phone call at his home in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba on July 19th from a man who identified himself as Juan Brunet. The call from a stranger he had never met before or heard of surprised the former political prisoner and independent journalist since his number is supposedly unlisted. The purpose of the call, however, quickly became evident.

"I'm watching you," the man said to Pedro, using an economy of words to put forth a serious threat.

In a typical society, a call of this nature is considered a genuine threat. But in a society of fear, repression, violence, and murder, such as the one millions of Cubans are forced to live in, a threat such as this is ominous. Unlike a society based on freedom and the rule of law, in Castro's Cuba these types of threats very easily come to fruition on the orders of a vile and criminal dictatorship.

Pedro Argüelles Morán is not the first Cuban to receive threats from the Castro dictatorship, and he will certainly not be the last. The threat, however, illustrates how despite the "reforms" being touted, the regime of Raul Castro continues to be a repressive and criminal dictatorship that will employ violence and threats of violence to control and quash those who dare oppose it.

Like the threat, an economy of words can be used to describe the reforms of Raul Castro: I'm Watching You.

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