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realclearworld

Remember Eliecer Avila?

http://www.ddcuba.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/content/image/eliecer.jpeg

Eliecer Avila

Do you remember Eliecer Avila? He is the young engineering student who in 2008 dared to ask Castro parliament president Ricardo Alarcon in a televised public forum why he as a Cuban did not have the same freedom to travel that the rest of the world enjoys. The embarrassing question became even more embarrassing for the regime when the president of the parliament attempted to give the young student an answer: The Cuban regime could not give him the right to travel freely, Alarcon stated, because if everyone had that right, the skies would be filled with airplanes and they would end up crashing into each other.

Well, Eliecer went on to graduate from the university with a degree in engineering. And today, unable to find work as an engineer, he is a street vendor trying to eke out a living selling ice cream.

Not only does Cuba have the best educated prostitutes, they also have the best educated sidewalk ice cream vendors.

The full report on Eliecer Avila's career in Castro's Cuba is available HERE (in Spanish).

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