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realclearworld

Free Speech in Cuba

USA Today columnist DeWayne Wickham, the same columnist who called for the release of the five Cuban spies serving prison terms for espionage and complicity in the murder of four innocent Americans using Castro propaganda as his argument, and the same columnist who called on Hillary Clinton to have a friendly dinner in Cuba with Castro officials to get a true read on what is happening on the island, has outdone himself. In his latest column, Wickham spews forth this preposterous gem:

DeWayne Wickham: Guillen and Cubans exercise free speech

HAVANA — Shortly before Major League Baseball manager Ozzie Guillen was banished for five games for professing to admire Fidel Castro’s survival skills, I chanced upon a meeting in the capital of this communist country where free speech exacted no such penalty.

It was a gathering of Cuban intellectuals -- writers, historians, social activists, journalists, educators and Communist Party functionaries -- who met at the National Union of Writers and Artists to discuss racial issues. The topics ranged from the role of hip-hop music in today’s Cuba to a commemoration of the 1912 massacre of thousands of blacks by Cuban government troops. And while there was a lot of agreement among those who crowded into the small meeting room, there was a surprising amount of disagreement -- the kind of dissent that critics say doesn’t go unpunished in Cuba.

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