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realclearworld

A glimpse behind the curtain

Castroite agent lectures unlucky scholarship students

Castroite agent lectures unlucky scholarship students

Here we have a great example of the way in which Castrolandia conducts its propaganda campaigns throughout the so-called Third World, and how journalists in those countries help the bastards.  Nothing new here.  Just a very revealing glimpse of the machinery.   To some, this may all seem inconsequential, but the cold hard truth is that this demonic smoke-and-mirrors trick played by the Castroites does actually fool many people.  Without this propaganda, Cuba would seem no different from any other despicable dictatorship.  Without such coverage in the press, the Castro regime would have probably collapsed decades ago, just as the old whites-only government of South Africa did.   And God help those who end up under the care of these medical students.

PETALING JAYA: Kumitha Vijayan Krishnarajah, 20, cannot wait to start her studies in Cuba, which is world-renowned for its medical studies.

The former SMK Kepong Baru student is one of four Malaysians who have been offered a Cuban government scholarship to study medicine at the Latin American School of Medicine (Elam) in Havana.

“I have been told that life is difficult in Cuba because it is a communist country. The seniors who are there tell us a different story though and say the people are very friendly,” said Kumitha.

“I am sure if you go anywhere new, you will experience some culture shock, but I am sure I will be able to adapt in time.”

Kumitha, who aspires to be a neurologist, is also relishing the challenge of mastering Spanish.

“It looks difficult but the seniors tell me that it will only be tough in the beginning. I am up for the challenge,” she said.

Kumitha and three other recipients of the scholarship attended a briefing by Cuban ambassador Ruben Perez Valdes yesterday, and are due to fly to Havana tomorrow.

The other recipients are Herrick Ting Tiew Ping, Esther Lim Shu Jean and Vinodh Sethumadavan.

Also at the briefing were Malaysians studying in Cuba, including third-year student Tiong Jia Hui.

The 21-year-old recently became the first Asian student to be elected vice-president of the medical school's student council.

“The experience of studying in Cuba has been very good. There are students from 97 countries at the school, so the inter-cultural exchanges are very enriching.

continue reading  here

PETALING JAYA: Kumitha Vijayan Krishnarajah, 20, cannot wait to start her studies in Cuba, which is world-renowned for its medical studies.
The former SMK Kepong Baru student is one of four Malaysians who have been offered a Cuban government scholarship to study medicine at the Latin American School of Medicine (Elam) in Havana.
“I have been told that life is difficult in Cuba because it is a communist country. The seniors who are there tell us a different story though and say the people are very friendly,” said Kumitha.
“I am sure if you go anywhere new, you will experience some culture shock, but I am sure I will be able to adapt in time.”
Kumitha, who aspires to be a neurologist, is also relishing the challenge of mastering Spanish.
“It looks difficult but the seniors tell me that it will only be tough in the beginning. I am up for the challenge,” she said.
Kumitha and three other recipients of the scholarship attended a briefing by Cuban ambassador Ruben Perez Valdes yesterday, and are due to fly to Havana tomorrow.
The other recipients are Herrick Ting Tiew Ping, Esther Lim Shu Jean and Vinodh Sethumadavan.
Also at the briefing were Malaysians studying in Cuba, including third-year student Tiong Jia Hui.
The 21-year-old recently became the first Asian student to be elected vice-president of the medical school's student council.
“The experience of studying in Cuba has been very good. There are students from 97 countries at the school, so the inter-cultural exchanges are very enriching.

groucho

2 comments to A glimpse behind the curtain