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realclearworld

One more meaningless feudal “reform”

Cuban serf tilling the soil for his feudal lords

Cuban serf tilling the soil for his feudal lords

The Associated Press can't seem to break the habit of regurgitating every "reform" decree issued by King Raul and his knights.   They are in good company, too.  Trawl for news from Cuba on the internet and what you will find lately is a hall of mirrors in which the official legerdemain of the Castro oligarchs is endlessly reflected.   Goebbels would have been astonished at the success of this propaganda machine.

What are these latest reforms about?   Allowing farmers to lease more land from their feudal lords, and granting them the "privilege" of building houses that they cannot own.  You can't even call this neo-feudalism because there is nothing new about it.  This is simply a return to the status quo of the 11th century, a full millennium ago.  They might as well start calling the farmers "serfs," for that is what they really are.

Of course, no mention is made of the fact that these leases are for land that has not been farmed for many years and is now engulfed by marabu, an invasive weed that has taken over about half of the island's once-fertile fields.

And, of course, the Washington Post picks up the story and slaps a photo of a third world peasant over the article -- replete with the obligatory starving oxen --  just to reinforce ancient prejudices about the congenital backwardness of all Latin people.   They were using the same photos before Castro came along.    Go here for two more revolting photos.

Cuba opens way to larger private farms on fallow government land

HAVANA — Cuba has announced that it is modifying rules for the handover of fallow land to independent farmers.

The measure goes into effect December 21. It is the latest in a series of economic reforms under President Raul Castro.

The new rules allow individual farmers to lease up to 67 hectares (165 acres), up from the current maximum of 40 hectares (98 acres). They also allow farmers to build homes on the land, which was previously prohibited.

The new law published Tuesday does not change the maximum length of the leases, which remains 10 years for individuals and 25 for cooperatives. Leases can be renewed.

The law does make it easier for farmers to keep the land in their family, giving priority to next of kin when leases expire.

13 comments to One more meaningless feudal “reform”

  • asombra

    "Government land." Says who? Based on what? Check the record, OK?

  • asombra

    Have these people ever said "President Batista" without calling him a dictator?

  • asombra

    "Independent farmers." In Cuba. Independent. Fucking liars.

  • asombra

    Those oxen look pitiful. But the photos are duly quaint, just the thing you'd find in a National Geographic piece on Cuba. I'm sure the "Latino" crowd finds them ever-so-charming, if not adorable.

  • Rayarena

    "What are these latest reforms about? Allowing farmers to lease more land from their feudal lords, and granting them the "privilege" of building houses that they cannot own."

    Correct me if I am wrong, but wasn't the "revolution" allegedly about getting rid of the Latifundio that allegedly dominated pre-castro Cuba? I remember many years ago reading pieces by "Cuba experts" and watching PBS specials and listening to college professors and idiotic teachers peaching about how Cuban peasants used to toil land that didn't belong to them, land that they would lease from rich families. This sounds very much like the same system. It's nothing but a repackaged latifundio system where instead of legitimate families like the Fanjuls, the Gomez-Mena, the Bacardi, the Batista-Fallas, the Babun's and others owning the land, you have just one entity, the regime [read this as the mafioso castro family].

  • Carlos Eire

    Exactly!

    And --paradoxically -- those idolaters who prefer to think of the Castro mafia as selfless holy men simply refuse to acknowledge this.

  • paul vincent zecchino

    Were those poor oxen in America the ASPCA would rescue them.

    The photo is indeed perfect for those National Geographic or PBS 'specials' which condemn the evils of 'agribusiness' and extol the virtues of 'sustainable farming'.

  • Honey

    Peta where are you? Protest Cuba's mistreatment of animals; I refer to the oxen, but if you want to infer the human animals, that's okay, too.

  • Rayarena

    "And --paradoxically -- those idolaters who prefer to think of the Castro mafia as selfless holy men simply refuse to acknowledge this"

    It seems that when it comes to Cuba, there's an inexplicable form of collective stupidity that falls over academia, all scholarly form flies out the window. Something else that has always baffled me is how the defenders of the revolution can ignore all stock footage of pre-castro Cuba where even the boomdocks [not just Havana] look prosperous [or at the very least not wretched].

    Watch any real film of pre-castro Cuba [there's one excellent video of Havana on Youtube that goes back to the1920's] and you think that you' re in Europe. Not one shoeless peasant, prosperous suit wearing citizens are seen going about on their business in a determined way, not like today where you see shirtless lifeless third-world looking people just rambling about with no place to go. The side streets are beaming with businesses, the buildings are spanking clean, no rubble, no collapsed edifices, the shrubbery is cut, the streets are paved not like today where you see potholes, overgrown weeds, buildings that are falling about and squalor everywhere.

    But apparently, in the same manner that the mainstream media and academia is not able to see through the charade of castro's "reforms," they are not able to compare contrast these videos. I guess that when it comes to defenders of the revolution, "a picture is not worth a million words."

  • asombra

    Ray, it's not stupidity. It's willful blindness. They see what they want to see, what suits their agenda and their narrative, and ignore, deny or distort the rest.

  • paul vincent zecchino

    Rayarena -

    Do you have the title/link to the 20s film of Havana? Isn't it interesting that the leftist rats in American always gush on and on about their beloved 'Great Depression' while PBS poops out drivel about "The THirties", but as with Havana, any photo or footage of the 20s America reveals a prospering, advancing nation?

    Funny the way the leftist rats always mock Calvin Coolidge while praising 'the arch criminal', FDR, that old red satyr in the wheelchair?

  • Rayarena

    Paul,

    Here's the link to the video. Just one minor mistake on my part, its Cuba in the 1930's, not 20's. Still for our purposes, this stock footage shows a prosperous looking metropolis that is far from the squalor and poverty that much of academia, the mainstream media and Hollywood would have us believe Cuba was like:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEMYLkpYxX8&feature=related

  • paul vincent zecchino

    Rayarena -

    Received the heads-up via e-mail, thanks for the link. Looking forward to seeing it tonite.
    z