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realclearworld

Reuters: “Mr. Obama, free the Cuban Five!”

Yes, you knew this was coming too.

Judy Gross is now saying that conservative Cuban exile politicians have prevented the release of her husband.  She also says that President B.O. can now afford to ignore those intransigent trolls and make a swap for the Cuban Five.

Yeah, you knew this was next.  No surprise.  Let's see how long it takes for the swap to take place.

While it is more than understandable for Mrs. Gross to yearn for any deal that will free her unjustly imprisoned and very ill husband, what are we to make of the fact that she is now suddenly pointing to Cuban exile politicians as the sole obstacle to her husband's release?   This is new: perhaps she had voiced this opinion before in private, but not to the press.

Add this one to the list of "reasonable" changes in U.S. Cuba policy that the Ministry of Truth is interested in promoting.

From the Chicago Tribune:

Wife of American jailed in Cuba pins hopes on Obama's re-election

MIAMI (Reuters) - The wife of Alan Gross, the U.S. contractor jailed in Cuba for crimes against the state, said she hopes President Barack Obama's re-election will soon help lead to her ailing husband's release from the communist-ruled country.

Gross, 63, has been locked up in Cuba since December 2009 for his work on behalf of a semi-covert U.S. program aimed at promoting political change on the island.

He is serving a 15-year sentence for setting up Internet networks in Cuba, work that a judge said was a crime against the Cuban state, and his imprisonment halted efforts by Obama to improve long-hostile relations between the United States and Cuba, which began soon after his first election in 2008.

"The U.S. government sent him there, they sent him on a project, and they need to take responsibility for getting this man home," Judy Gross told Reuters in an interview late on Friday.

Calling her husband a "pawn" in an unfortunate game between two countries just 90 miles apart, she said she believed Obama's re-election could now help his administration push harder for Gross's freedom, even if it means making possible concessions to Cuba that are opposed by conservative Cuban-American lawmakers.

"Nobody has ever come and said 'oh well, we're not doing this because of the election.' But obviously that's what we think was going on, and we'll find out," Judy Gross said.

"It's going to take a few more weeks and we'll be in contact with the administration, and we'll hope for the best," she added.

She did not elaborate on exactly what Washington could do to win Gross's freedom. But she said he has had considerable weight loss since his arrest, as well as having degenerative arthritis and an untreated potentially cancerous mass behind his shoulder. She has been pressing for his release on humanitarian grounds.

"He's a pawn in the sense that Cuba wants something for him and the United States is unwilling to give that up," Gross said in the phone interview.

She spoke as she prepared to travel from Washington to Florida for a rally on Sunday in West Palm Beach to press for her husband's release.

Cuba has said it proposed talks with the United States about resolving the Gross case but has received no answer. It has hinted that it was prepared to swap Gross for five Cuban government agents who received lengthy U.S. prison sentences in a 2001 trial in Miami.

Washington has insisted that such a deal is out of the question though U.S. officials said last year they had suggested a swap of Gross for one agent, Rene Gonzalez, who is out on parole in Florida.

10 comments to Reuters: “Mr. Obama, free the Cuban Five!”

  • Rayarena

    It's not going to happen, because Cuban-Americans are not institution builders, but we really need a Think Tank or PR machine of some type. Ms. Gross is obviously desperate, she's caving in to the manipulations of the regime as a last ditch effort to save her husband's life. It's sad that this transparent blackmail of a poor desperate woman by an unscrupulous regime is allowed to go on unanswered and as usual, we come out as the heavies.

  • Mambí

    Sorry Ray, but I'm convinced that it will. Obama and the Dems, in their twisted little minds, believe they have a mandate, coupled with the surveys showing the traditional Cuban-American vote has been 'broken'. So, they will now inact their leftist ideological platform wrt Cuba Policy: exchange the five for Gross, drop travel restrictions, drop the embargo, and establish full relations! As they enact each policy they will pitch it as a way to bring democracy to the island by 'engaging' the beasts that rule it. Jimmy Carter did the same when he opened the Interest Section, and he hasn't cared one bit that nothing ever changed, Obama won't either. The Fat Lady is about to sing on our valiant battle to deligitimize the Castro Regime/system and bring about it's downfall.

  • asombra

    Entirely predictable. I expect a certain newly elected Cubanoid congressperson will find the swap quite acceptable (for humanitarian reasons, naturally, the same reasons routinely given for the ever-growing flow of money and goods to Castrolandia from its satellite subjects abroad). I can’t really blame Mrs. Gross, realistically speaking, since she must realize that Obama is never going to get her husband released in any other way, and she’s simply taking the easiest available path and the one most likely to work for her husband and family. The welfare of Cuba and Cubans, obviously, is not her issue or responsibility. If (or when) the swap is made, all the usual suspects will find it perfectly fitting and reasonable, and Obama knows that. Those who object will simply be dismissed as heartless and hateful, and Obama will never be taken to task for not doing what could and should have been done to free Gross long ago. Such a deal.

  • Rayarena

    Mambi, sorry, I didn't elaborate what I meant. I was referring to the creation of a think tank/institution. That's what's not going to happen. I meant to say that we need some sort of institution to speak up for us, but we won't create it, so the lies continue to be perpetrated [i.e. the majority of Cuban Americans support relations with Cuba, want the embargo lifted, the generational shift, etc..]. But, yes, I concur with you that the exchange will take place as will the unilateral lifting of the embargo with no concessions from the USA.

  • asombra

    Ray, your point is valid, but we need other things even more, like dignity.

  • asombra

    And yes, I expect the Gross family voted for Obama this year as in 2008. I expect they very much wanted him re-elected, since they figured that meant a much better chance for the spy swap taking place than under a Romney presidency--which is correct, although Romney might have done what Obama failed to do to free Gross in his first term, and Gross might have been freed without dishonor, disgrace, moral travesty or capitulation. Well, prepare for the latter.

  • Mambí

    Got it Ray, and yes, kinda sad that after 50 years we don't have one. For the longest we relied on the CANF to be our standard bearer, but now those bastards have gone to the dark side as well. I guess the closest we have is the ICCAS at the University of Miami. The Director has always been very cleared-eyed when it comes to Cuba issues; standing up for the embargo, ridiculing the 'reforms' of Raul, clearly stating that the new 'travel reforms' are an invitation to legalized mass migration, etc. Unfortunately, I believe the Institute is partially beholden to Carlos Saladrigas and therefore may be guarded at times. It's tough to feel optimistic at this point.

  • Rayarena

    Mambi,

    The tragic thing is that it didn't have to be this way. For 50+ years, castro has been on the offensive and we have been reacting. Now, we don't even react. As I mentioned, Cubans are not institution builders. The average wealthy Cuban who could [following in the footsteps of American Jews] fund institutions, don't. Look at the American Jewish community, they have B'nai Birth, HADASSAH, Jewish World Congress, AIPAC, Anti-Defamation League, etc..etc..

    The average mega-wealthy Cuban [and there are at least 100 families that are worth over $100,000,000] prefer to built a legacy for themselves. Perhaps this is a Spanish trait, something we inherited from the Iberian peninsula where everybody is divided and there is no sense of real nation, where you are first and foremost either an Asturian, a Galician, an Andalus, a Castilian or a Basque. I don't know. Sad thing is that Cubans don't care. Without the proper institution--and sadly ICCAS is ignored by the MSM and does not have the far reach--we are ignored and our reality is rewritten over and over again by our enemies.

    Why I ask myself can't some Cuban millionaire fund a legitimate Chair for Cuban studies at some University? Is it greed? Perhaps. Look at how Jorge Mas Santos sold the Freedom Tower at a profit. As you know, his late father had restored the outside and had plans to create a Cuban Museum documenting what we have suffered under castro. His son could only see the dollar signs and sold it. Not content with the selling of the Freedom Tower, he destroyed CANF. I guess that it wasn't a money making venture. It's very sad.

    The only real visionary that we had was Reinaldo Arenas. During the ten years that he lived in the USA, he did more against castro than anyone else before or after him. He produced the film "Improper Conduct" that for the first time made liberals examine their support of castro, and he also gathered signatures from intellectuals from around the world added to a letter asking castro to hold a plebiscite. Published in major world newspapers, it was very damaging to castro's image. Finally, his acclaimed posthumous autobiography further chipped away at castro's carefully cultivated public image and was turned into an award winning movie that further sullied castro's image. Reinaldo was able to break through castro's teflon exterior.

  • Mambí

    Yes Ray, good points, it is very disheartening. As you said, maybe it's our Iberian DNA. For God's sake, they were conquered by the Muslims because of their self-centered disunity. It took them almost 800 years to finally kick them out, once again because of their disunity and willingness to 'work with the devil' at times. Fucking sad....

  • FreedomForCuba

    Mambi,

    I share your fears, I suspect is going to get much tougher from the point on...