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realclearworld

Reuters does back flips over Cuban government issued employment numbers

Here we go again...

Reuter's man in Havana, Marc Frank (former writer for the People's Daily World published by the Communist Party USA), is doing back flips over the latest employment figures released by the Castro dictatorship in Cuba. The numbers show an astonishing growth in "public sector" jobs on the island over the past two years that seemingly vindicate the so-called economic reforms of Cuba's repressive and totalitarian regime.

Cuba cuts state payroll, private sector jobs grow 23 pct in 2012

HAVANA, Dec 27 (Reuters) - Cuba's drive to slash state payrolls and spur private-sector growth picked up surprising steam in 2012 as President Raul Castro moved ahead with reforms to the Soviet-style economy, according to figures unveiled recently with little hoopla.

The number of private or "non state" workers rose 23 percent in 2012, while state sector employment dropped 5.7 percent, according to a report from Economy Minister Adel Yzquierdo Rodriguez. The unemployment rate grew to a record 3.8 percent, not including Cubans who did not seek work.

The wide-ranging year-end report to the National Assembly, which met in Havana last week, indicated the government is quietly making progress toward its goal of moving toward a more market-oriented economy while maintaining the socialist system in place the last half century.

Just a few years ago, the state employed more than 85 percent of Cuba's labor force, but that is changing as the government battles heavy indebtedness, economic stagnation, poor retail services and pilfering.

The report said the government cut 228,000 public jobs in 2012, on top of the previously announced 137,000 in 2011, closing in on its goal to slash 20 percent, or nearly a million jobs, from its bloated payrolls, by 2016.

At the same time, the number of private, or "non-state" workers as Cuba calls them, rose to 1.1 million jobs, double the number reported two years ago.

This is certainly good news for the Castro regime, "Cuba Experts," and the many supporters the Cuban dictatorship in the press and throughout the world. The Cuban government are experts at manufacturing statistics and crafting propaganda, and with numbers like these, the difficult job of defending and promoting the brutal and murderous dictatorship in Cuba by all the Castro sycophants becomes a bit easier.

But before Marc Frank and his fellow Castro propagandists pop the bubbly and start dancing the jig as they wait for their front-row press passes for Fidel's funeral parade in Havana, lets look at some real numbers coming from the island. These statistics were not manufactured by the Castro regime and paint a much different picture of what life in Cuba these past two years has been all about.

Via CIHPRESS, an independent news agency in Cuba:

Politically Motivated Arrests in Cuba during 2010: 1,499

Politically Motivated Arrests in Cuba through November, 2012: 4,982

According to these numbers, which Reuters has never dared to touch or report, Cuba has seen a  232% increase in politically motivated arrests in the past two years. And 2012 is not even over yet.

Naturally, Reuters would rather measure the progress of Raul Castro's "reforms" by using the manufactured statistics supplied to them by the dictatorship. This propaganda was specifically tailored and lovingly put together in order to help journalists such as Reuter's Marc Frank to promote the Castro dictatorship. If they were to throw in some real numbers  that show the reality of life in Cuba's repressive society, such as the astronomical increase in political arrests during Raul Castro's "reforms," that would only muck things up and distract from the narrative assigned to them by the Cuban government.

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