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realclearworld

Reuters not convinced Cuban dictatorship is a dictatorship

It is sadly what we have come to expect from the world's news agencies when it comes to reporting on Cuba: They sell out the truth, their integrity, and the Cuban people in order to obtain the privilege of access to the island and the Castro dictatorship. Nevertheless, we will continue exposing them along with the regime they defend because one day, the truth will be known.

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

Has Reuters' Havana Bureau Lost Its Mind?

In an article today about the announced elimination of the exit permit by the Castro regime, which supposedly goes into effect on January 14th, Reuters writes:

"They were fodder for Castro opponents who charged the Cuban government was a brutal dictatorship that deprived its people of the right to travel and other freedoms."

First of all, like all of Castro's so-called "reforms," the devil is in the details.  Most of the exit permit restrictions are simply being transferred over to the passport process.

Moreover, the proof will be in the pudding after it actually goes into effect, as the regime will continue to arbitrarily decide who is allowed to leave the country.

Yet, regardless, when did Castro stop being a brutal dictatorship?

Didn't 2012 register the largest number of political arrests (6,602) in decades?

When did the Castro regime stop repressing anyone that dares dissent?

Exactly what freedoms does the Castro regime recognize and respect?

Just name one from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Has Reuters' Havana bureau lost it mind?

Or just its objectivity?

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