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realclearworld

This “War on Poverty” is Lost

"It just shows you what a desperate need that they needed it..."

REALLY?!?!?

Go to a third world country where people are starving and look like people from the WWII Holocaust. Bring in a pot of food, clothing, medicine. THOSE people have NOTHING and are carrying their emaciated, dying children and babies in their arms. THEY don't storm the aid teams or tables. THEY don't push and shove in line. THEY don't trample each other and throw things. No, THAT sort of thing happens here, where a created class of people have been taught to feel entitled to the benefits of other people who have struggled, worked hard, and accomplished for themselves. And they honestly believe it is being kept from the government, and in doing so, kept from them.

Look at Detroit. It is a microscopic slide of where we are going, and exactly where the left intends for us to be. It is total control. It is disgusting. A complete loss and ignorance of personal responsibility. You know where the left wants this sort of thing to go? They have spent years, and the better part of the last 5 years, demonizing anyone who has anything. The left wants this sort of anarchy to move to people's homes. We already saw Occupy Wall Street taking over private and public property, and even homes a year ago. Squatting. Destroying. Stealing. Defacing. And if you think this is bad, wait until ObamaCare is in full swing and lacking the money, medines, doctors, nurses, and ER space/time ... because THAT is exactly where poeple like this will flock for free healthcare. This will be in addition to those who do have private insurance who will be discovering their premiums going up and/or employers dropping coverage for employees, leaving them to fend for themselves in the government plan.

I am telling you, re-watch Doctor Zhivago. It's all in there...

Obama's Zero-Sum Game and the Coming Redistribution Bubble

Since President Obama has chosen to ignore the constraints that exist in the zero-sum framework, one can ask what value he sees in it as the guiding policy of his administration. The answer is simple: since FDR, Democrats have exploited the emotions of the electorate with regard to money. There is a natural envy among the poor toward the wealthy; they do not want to respect the achievements of the wealthy as being a result of hard work, intelligence, and motivation. The only wealthy persons the poor respect are those in sports, music, or motion pictures.

It is all too easy for politicians to exploit the resentment hardworking taxpayers may feel toward the rich. In fact, politicians have worked very hard to encourage this resentment, harvesting it to create widespread support for public spending programs. Democrats do not conceive of the zero-sum framework as one that contains restraints. Rather, they use the political support they obtain from it to create budget deficits.

The zero-sum rhetoric has enabled President Obama to create what can be called a redistribution bubble. Not all of his spending goes toward income redistribution, but he carefully refuses to categorize his spending.

[...]

The zero-sum concept has macroeconomic consequences. Once the bubble breaks, these consequences will be all too real for working Americans, and by then little will be able to be done to ameliorate their effects.

Obama's greatest achievement may turn out to be that he proves, once and for all, that income redistribution has the tendency to hurt the very people it purports to help. This is true of not just President Obama, but other Democrats as well: their unwillingness to exercise spending constraint is caused by their refusal to see the zero-sum theory as mandating constraint.

Since most economists know this, and Obama and his advisers should reasonably know this, their use of income redistribution rhetoric to grow government and overspend proves that they are willing to create financial hardship for working people in order to win elections and maintain political power. In effect, Democrats are using redistribution rhetoric to exploit the working class -- the very thing they accuse the rich of doing, and the very thing they say can be cured only with the use of zero-sum taxation guidelines.

Read in full...

The democrats like to bring up Pres. Bush's "two unpaid for wars" as the cause of a nearing $16.5 trillion debt, in spite of the fact that Obama has spent over a $1 trillion per year since he has been in office, with no end in sight. He has taken over the unfunded "War on Poverty" started under LBJ. It is time for us to pull out of this war...

7 comments to This “War on Poverty” is Lost

  • antonio2009

    OBAMANATION.

  • FreedomForCuba

    Drill,

    I have a story for you,

    My Dad grew up during the depression years in a farm in Cuba near the famous port of Mariel.

    He used to tell me that there was a sewer ditch underneath the road that ran parallel to his house and every week a new destitute/homeless family moved inside that sewer to seek shelter. This is prime example of how bad things were in rural Cuba in those days.

    According to Dad, my very kind grandmother(his Mom)used to cook a daily big pot of rice and beans and send it with any of her nine kids (whoever was available at the time) to whichever family was living inside that sewer to help them have some sort of nourishment.

    My grandfather was the farm foreman at the time, responsible for supervising the farm workers and the harvesting of main cash crop for that farm which it was sugarcane.

    As the farm’s foreman my grandfather earned about $80 a month, which it wasn’t bad money for the times. The issue was that he had a big family (nine kids and a wife) so in a way they struggled too.

    At least food was plentiful at their household in those days because they planted their own crops and grew livestock (chickens, pigs, goats and cattle) for their own consumption.

    They could not afford any luxuries whatsoever and yet they had a happy life. Still remember how Dad fondly spoke of the some of the happiest times in his life were spent at that farm during those days.

    This Obama nation of today doesn’t have a freaking clue what it is to reality struggle and sacrifice in life. One day they may come to regret big time embracing the “anointed one” and his Marxist/Socialist policies.

    On the other hand I just don’t know if they'll ever realize it as there is so much stupidity prevalent in America today (especially among the Obama nation characters).

    I just live it at that...

  • FreedomForCuba

    Drill,

    BTW, Antonio knows where is the farm my father grew up in. He wrote about it in his Moncada Barrack attack book.

  • drillanwr

    FreedomForCuba

    The 'War on Poverty' in this country basically began under FDR during the Great Depression. Most leaned on the government programs, but did not depend on them, some even feeling too much pride and shame to do so. FDR's programs were meant (allegedly) to be temporary. It was LBJ that expanded such State-run programs into a way of life for generations now. I get really sick and tired of pro-welfare types insisting we don't care about the poor or the children or the elderly if we oppose the massive spending(s) on these endless, lifelong, generational entitlements. Places such as Detroit are a stark example of how successful the democrats have been in this 'war' ... Detroit is a solid democrat voting block.

  • drillanwr

    During the time of your Grandfather's story...

    My Grandfather (my Dad's Dad) was in his early 30s. There were 6 children at home, all under the age of 10, and some just toddlers or babies, with my Grandmother, my Father the oldest. My Grandfather collapsed and died from a heart attack one morning while at work at the gas station just blocks from their house. My Grandmother had to go to work, no life insurance policy for most folks back then. People pressured Grandma to send her kids away to other people, and she strongly refused. When the kids got old enough they got jobs delivering papers, cutting grass, setting bowling pins, washing walls/floors, delivering groceries, etc. All money going into the household budget. Some of her neighbors had more kids and less in the home. Grandma did what she could for them too ... baked an additional loaf of bread, extended a pot of soup, an additional pie, some hand-me-downs. The only assistance my Grandmother took was from her church, to which to her dying day she paid back, and then some, with very nice monthly donations. When Grandma was just a little girl in Western PA. they lived on a farm and her father worked in the area coal mine. One day her mother died suddenly, leaving him with endless chores on the farm and a houseful of children. So, Grandma quit school and stayed home to tend to the family and whatever chores she had to do.

    My Hungarian Grandfather (my Mom's Dad) worked on the railroad, and was an alcoholic. There were 7 children at home with my Grandmother, my Mother the youngest. She barely saw much more than a dime of Grandpa's paychecks (as he drank them away wherever his hangout was). They had one cow for milk (and butter and cream) and a coup of chickens (sold eggs, chicken meat, and dairy products from the cow) ... and the occasional pig. Grandma (and Grandpa) had an enormous garden, some fruit trees on the property, and so she canned. She would do laundry, sewing, ironing for some of the neighbors, and they paid her (not nearly what its value would be today), or they would give her a pig or some other barter of household use. Grandma also be paid to kill and clean chickens and butcher (dead) cows and pigs the neighbors brought to her since some of the area women were too squeamish, and Grandma had been doing such things since childhood on the farm in Hungary. Some of her kids were a bit older than my Dad and his siblings at the time, so they had jobs at the local grocery store, worked some odd jobs around the neighborhood, and on area farms, etc. She took no government assistance available at the time. Her church(es ... they had 2) helped a little when needed, but most times she was helping others in the church and around her neighborhood who had even less than they had. She provided all 7 kids with clothing, school supplies, food, medicine, etc. Eventually Grandpa hit rock bottom, Grandma had the police drag him away to dry out in jail. He eventually returned home with his heart and soul in his hand weeping for forgiveness I have an antique metal candy box Grandma kept all his letters in that he had written to her from the dry tank. Someday I need to have them translated. My Mom said every time Grandma got another in the mail she would cry when she read them silently. All she would tell my Mother was that Grandpa was pleading and begging for her to forgive him. When he returned home he never touched 'the stuff' again. I have relayed my Hungarian Grandmother's childhood story in Hungary here before (her father having immigrated to the U.S. ahead of the rest of the family in order to get a job, establish a house, and send them money to join him ... however WWI broke out while he was away.)

    So, we see through your story and mine these were even far, far tougher times with far less resources readily available for folks in such near dire situations. Everyone in the family did what they could in order for everyone to survive. Yet, they were civil, and even gracious when not having much themselves. They were self-dependent, yet, compassionate and charitable. They also insisted on paying back whatever 'debt' they felt they had (typically through the church).If there were lines for anything people didn't riot when whatever was being handed out ran out. They gathered themselves and left.

    Yet, we are criticized for pointing out the people standing in lines today are dressed in hundreds of dollars worth of high-end shoes and clothing and jewelry, have cell phones, drive newer model cars (than me), have high-end technology entertainment items in their 'Section 8' housing, sell their food stamps for cash or don't use them wisely in the grocery stores to get the best amounts and nutrition possible out of them for their families... Yet, we are racist if we insist they attend child care and nutrition classes in exchange for giving them the 'free' food? The people who have been on the government tit for years/generations are in for a very rude awakening when the amount(s) they are currently receiving decrease as more and more people become part of such entitlement programs the democrats appear to be rejoicing about and always looking to extend.

  • drillanwr

    It's true, we have the 'richest poor' in the world, not only in possessions, but in access to assistance/entitlements.

    Also, there is a serious lack of work ethic in this country, not just in the 'poor' communities.

  • FreedomForCuba

    You're so right Drill, we all have our families stories to share and thanks for sharing yours because it shows to the readers the many sacrifices made by our elders and the challenges they endured in their lifetime.

    Sadly our country is a far cry from what it was many years ago because many people have lost traditional American values.

    This is what scares me the most...