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realclearworld

New Cuban migration law: The new Mariel Boatlift?

Guillermo Martinez in the Sun-Sentinel:

New Cuban migration law causes questions, skepticism

The anxiously-awaited new Cuban migration law went into effect Monday. Now the questions begin.

Will Cuba allow doctors, professionals, and dissidents to take advantage of its new law, or will it still pick and choose who it allows the benefits of the new law? How easy will it be for Cubans to obtain visas to other countries and how will they finance their trips?

But the most important question of all: How will this affect the flow of Cubans to the United States?

[...]

As a journalist who has covered Cuba for more than half a century, color me skeptical. Cuba's purpose in enacting new migration law is not humanitarian. It is a way for Cuba to grow its economy with monies sent by Cubans from abroad.

For the United States and for South Florida, it is an issue we should all think about seriously. Yes, it is not likely the number of Cubans who come to the country directly will increase. Already 38,000 a year are coming with visas, or by crossing the border with Mexico and asking that they be allowed to enter the country legally under the "wet-foot; dry-foot" policy enacted by Bill Clinton during the last migration crisis in 1994.

It would be illogical to think the United States would increase the number of tourist visas it gives Cubans now.

If they are young they can work and save money to take back to Cuba at the end of their stay. If they are over 65, they are entitled to minimum benefits given in this country to those who aren't eligible for Social Security; food stamps and who knows what else. They can live here on that money or if they live with relatives send money back to the island.

Question: Who pays for this? Easy answer: we all do. This is not a humanitarian move. This is a thinly-disguised Mariel boatlift.

Read the entire editorial HERE.

1 comment to New Cuban migration law: The new Mariel Boatlift?