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realclearworld

Cuba turns on fiber-optic internet cable; one-way traffic only

It took them years longer than they claimed, but the Castro regime has finally "turned on" the fiber-optic internet cable strung from Venezuela to Cuba. Of course, like everything else about the Castro dictatorship, it only goes one way - their way. Traffic is only flowing in and nothing is coming out.

Via Computer World:

Cuba turns on submarine internet cable, but just for one-way traffic

Internet traffic appears to only be flowing to, not from, the country via the cable, according to internet routing analyst Renesys

A change in Internet traffic patterns over the past week suggests that Cuba may have turned on a fiber-optic submarine cable that links it to the global Internet via Venezuela, according to Internet routing analysis company Renesys.

Renesys noticed that the Spanish telecommunications company TelefA3nica began routing Internet traffic to Cuba's state telecommunications company, Empresa de Telecomunicaciones de Cuba S.A. (ETECSA), wrote Doug Madory, senior research engineer.

The Internet traffic is flowing with significantly lower latencies than before, indicating the connection is not solely using the three satellite providers that Cuba has relied on in the past for connectivity, Madory wrote.

Cuba and Venezuela began building a submarine cable in 2007 called the "Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra AmA(c)rica" or ALBA-1 for short. Jamaica is also connected to ALBA-1.

Due to delays, construction was not completed until 2011, and even then, Cuba continued to use the satellite internet providers despite announcing the cable had been completed, Madory wrote.

Renesys, which analyzes Internet routing data to improve network performance for its clients, saw TelefA3nica delivering data to Cuba in its routing data last week. But the data appears to be flowing only into Cuba and not out of the country, Madory wrote.

Continue reading HERE.

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