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realclearworld

Cuban regime builds internet censorship center in Miramar

Via DIARIO DE CUBA (my translation):

Cuban regime builds internet censorship center in Miramar

'Its mission will be to monitor the flow of information that enters and leaves Cuba through the fiber optic-cable,' said one source.

A center to control and censor the internet built in the Miramar neighborhood of the Cuban nation's capital could begin operations before the end of the year, various sources told DIARIO DE CUBA.

Officially, the building will house the Information Laboratory of the Interior Ministry (MININT).

"Once it is finished, it will become the general headquarters and control point for all of the island's intranets," said a source in Havana. "Its mission will be to censor and monitor the flow of information that enters and leaves Cuba through the fiber-optic cable."

Neighbors of the installation confirmed to DDC that the building, located on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 60th, belongs to MININT "for something that has to do with computers and the internet."

A source familiar with technology said the intention of the government is to "expand the intranet in a Chinese fashion," but that "it's so difficult to implement that they are paralyzed."

China offers internet to all its citizens at a reasonable cost, but its content is highly censored.

Currently, Havana has begun to install ADSL connections in the  state-run sector, especially for members of MININT, directors, and government journalists. Nevertheless, at 1MB, connection speeds are inferior.

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