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realclearworld

The State Department’s René González ‘Goat Rope’

Lt. Col. Chris Simmons at Cuba Confidential:

Commentary: The State Department’s René González “Goat Rope”

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_YV2gEA9DNhw/S9jYJgtcaBI/AAAAAAAAcUs/kIvN3HJwJ4M/s1600/ChrisSimmonsTshirtnegro.jpgIn a story covered by the Associated Press and other media outlets (see yesterday’s posting), Castro regime officials decried their lack of access to René González. A convicted spy and paroled felon, René González was part of the Wasp Network, the largest spy ring EVER KNOWN to have operated in the United States.

So at the risk of being obtuse, why was René González – AN AMERICAN CITIZEN – ever allowed consular visits with Cuban officials in the first place? Which State Department bureaucrat, clearly asleep at the wheel, thought it was a good idea to allow a foreign government access to an American traitor? I can’t imagine any legal interpretation that would ever allow such a fiasco.

Now the State Department finds itself in a real goat rope. Having seen the errors of their ways, they are now refusing Havana’s arrogant and insane request for morale-building visits with its former spy. But having allowed it initially, the Castro brother’s minions are having a field day spinning up the propaganda machine denouncing America’s “unfairness.” Rather than continue to lose the information war to Cuba, the State Department needs to dig deep (way deep), find some intestinal courage, admit the error and remind the world that AMERICAN felons do not rate consular visits from their former spy bosses.

Born in Chicago in 1956, René González was raised in the city’s “North Side.” As a youngster, his parents took him on outings to Lake Michigan, the Lincoln Park Zoo, and the Riverview Amusement Park. Initially raised on the 1300 block of bustling North Ashland Avenue (a Polish neighborhood), better-paying jobs later took the family to northwest Indiana. When he was five years old, his parents left the U.S. to join the fledgling Cuban Revolution.

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