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realclearworld

Reports from Cuba: Welcome to Do Not Enter

By Henry Constantin:

Welcome to Do Not Enter

la mensura
La Mensura is nearly a kilometer high and 25 individual and dusty kilometers from Mayari, there in the eastern part of Holguin province, Cuba. One kilometer in height that becomes an infinite zigzag to climb, although most travelers find it easy.

It is a rough hill, very rough, and guarded: the slopes are like the back of someone who lost out in a duel with machetes, as has the embankment. The level of deforestation is remarkable; the pines that cover the mountain are young; the dense damp forest vegetation that often covers mountains in the east is missing. At the end of the winding road, right at the top, stands a military zone with a corresponding “Do Not Enter”, which seems to warn: you, be careful, don’t try to get too high.

Far away to the northeast, are other mountains, and the reddish deserts of the Nicaro mines. To the south, the road continues in the foothills, and leads to Mella and Palmarito de Cauto, Jose Daniel Ferrer’s village. Taking advantage of the excellent coverage, we call on the mobile phone but didn’t get a signal: it was later revealed that it had been blocked, once more, by the owners of Cubacel.

Below, between the hill and the road, a nice tourist site, with pool and alpine-like huts, surrounded by fresh green and songbirds. All for a price per day that exceeds the average monthly wage of any Cuban. At the entrance, another sign of prohibition of access in English only, but as crystal clear as the military zone, “Welcome to Villa Pinares de Mayari.”

vista desde la mensura

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