PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Gallardo: Raul, always being the obnoxious and detestable degenerate he is. If it wasn’t so obvious before it’s because his...

  • Ziva Sahl: The uniforms remind of my high school marching band uniforms back in the day. Students picked one from the collection that was...

  • asombra: Gee, I wonder what those red stains on Nosferatu’s hand could be. Take a guess. Somehow, Lady Macbeth comes to mind:...

  • asombra: Those guard costumes, er, uniforms keep getting tackier, but the hats are a hoot. Of course, they have to be RED. Heaven forbid...

  • asombra: Now, now; I expect he likes guava pastelitos, or is ready to claim he does, which of course makes him OK. Seriously, if Reno was...

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Some Cuba truth visits Ohio

Anna Lee, Laida Carro, and John Suarez visit Ohio to tell the truth about Cuba.

Via the Marietta Times:

Visiting activists share Cuba’s human rights plight

http://www.mariettatimes.com/photos/news/md/551331_1.jpgCuba is only 90 miles from the shores of the U.S., but many more miles away in terms of human rights, a group of visiting activists shared with more than 100 area college students during a visit to Marietta this week.

The group will share more during a forum at 8 p.m. Saturday at Washington State Community College. The event is free and open to the public.

Activists John Suarez, Laido Carro and Anna Lee shared stories of torture, suspicious deaths of those who questioned the government and indoctrination beginning at birth for Cuban residents.

Human rights advocates Laida Carro, left, and John Suarez, center, speak with Professor Tanya Wilder at Washington State Community College Friday. Along with activist Anna Lee, not pictured, the group spoke with college students Thursday and Friday about human rights violations taking place in Cuba, just 90 miles off the U.S. coast.

Cuba has been under a totalitarian regime for more than 50 years, said Carro, who left Cuba along with her family at the age of 12, shortly after Fidel Castro took the reigns of government. His younger brother, Raul, is now in power, and the government has long denied many of the human rights violations of which it is accused.

The systematic indoctrination of the Cuban people begins incredibly young, with government-paid school teachers manipulating children to believe in the Castros, but not a god, said Carro.

"The government considers religion a threat to its power," she said.

Continue reading HERE.

Comments are closed.