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Vietnam’s human rights violations: The Cuba of Southeast Asia

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Yesterday, we exposed the fallacious argument used by "Cuba Experts" and Castro sycophants in the U.S. that doing business with and engaging communist dictatorships, such as the one in Vietnam, has benefited the oppressed people of those country. Today, we expose how like their communist cousins in the Caribbean, Cuba, Vietnam is a gross violator of human rights and is engaged in human trafficking in Southeast Asia.

What has all the engagement and business with Vietnam's brutal dictatorship achieved? Nothing but endless slavery and oppression.

Michael Benge in American Thinker:

Communist Vietnam -- Human Trafficker Extraordinaire

Vietnam is now the proud possessor of the inglorious title "The Worst Human Rights Violator in Southeast Asia," according to recent testimony before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. State-affiliated labor export companies are major suppliers of men, women, and children to the forced labor and sex trafficking markets, while government officials profit from kickbacks.

Statistics on Vietnam's human trafficking range widely; though accurate information about this communist country is hard to find. Vietnam's Ministry of Public Security offers an official figure of 2,935 Vietnamese who were subjected to human trafficking between 2004 and 2009. However, international organizations report a far larger number; more than 400,000 victims since 1990. Even this covers only those reported as victims, omitting untold tens of thousands of abuses that go unnoticed, especially in the labor force.

Exporting workers is nothing new for Vietnam. After the 1975 communist takeover, hundreds of thousands of laborers were sent to the Soviet Union and European Eastern-Bloc countries as a form of war debt payment. Many ended up jobless, in debt, and stranded. Vietnam quickly graduated from supplying forced labor to trafficking women and children as sex slaves.

State-Sanctioned Sex Slavery

Vietnam is a primary supplier for commercial sexual exploitation, as well as forced labor -- and some who start out as laborers also wind up as sex slaves. Fraudulent or misrepresented marriages are one method by which Vietnamese women are exploited. The lure of marriage to a man in a comparatively rich country, coupled with a promised payment of up to $5,000 (ten times the average annual wage in Vietnam), is often too great a temptation for rural women and their impoverished families to resist. Women and children are sent to Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan, Macau, the Middle East, and Europe. In turn, Cambodian children are trafficked to urban centers in Vietnam. Increasingly, Vietnam is a destination for child sex tourism, with perpetrators visiting from Japan, the Republic of Korea, China, Taiwan, the UK, Australia, Europe, and the U.S. Women are also shipped to other countries to serve as surrogate mothers. Some are forced to produce babies for families that cannot have their own, while others have their babies sold for adoption by foreigners, primarily from Western countries.

Continue reading HERE.

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