PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • asombra: Che Guevara, for one, was all for the USSR crushing the Hungarian uprising, just as Fidel later kissed Soviet ass by being all...

  • asombra: Carlos, it’s OK. They’re Latrines, which means their concept of shame and disgrace is VERY different from yours, so...

  • asombra: The NYT is simply protecting its creature, its Frankenstein, as it always has and always will. The Herbert Matthews business was...

  • asombra: Bad Negroes have to be taught a lesson. Massah Castro don’t like no uppity slaves, especially black ones.

  • asombra: A lot of these people object to Hitler merchandising more out of social conditioning than true moral outrage. That’s also...

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

A conservative conception of universal human rights

Via Notes from the Cuban Exile Quarter:

A conservative conception of universal human rights

“All the races of the world are men, and of all men and of each individual there is but one definition, and this is that they are rational. All have understanding and will and free choice, as all are made in the image and likeness of God . . . Thus the entire human race is one.” - Bishop Bartolomé De Las Casas (1550)

Yesterday, over twitter Joel R. Pruce, a Post Doc in Human Rights Studies at the University of Dayton, made a remarkable claim: "Either you are for a liberal conception of universal human rights, or you're politically conservative. Can't be both."

The essay below will make the case that this is not only incorrect but exposes a misunderstanding of the origins of the idea of universal human rights and the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948.

The discourse and modern concept of human rights emerged out of internal debates within the Catholic Church in the late Middle Ages and the very universality of human rights emerged out of a debate in which a Catholic Bishop defended the rights of the indigenous peoples of America. This at a time when liberals refused to recognize it in favor of their commercial interests.

"The missionary Church opposed this state of affairs from the beginning, and nearly everything positive that was done for the benefit of the indigenous peoples resulted from the call and clamor of the missionaries. The fact remained, however, that widespread injustice was extremely difficult to uproot ... Even more important than Bartolome de Las Casas was the Bishop of Nicaragua, Antonio de Valdeviso, who ultimately suffered martyrdom for his defense of the Indian." [Dussel, E. 1981]

Human rights and the concept that all human beings are equal in dignity before their maker is at the root of the universal human rights standard and it is not a "liberal conception" but a profoundly conservative one rooted in that most conservative and anti-modern of institutions the Roman Catholic Church. This is not how many modern academics view the Catholic Church of the 15th and 16th Century but rather as accomplices to authoritarian rule.

Continue reading HERE.

Comments are closed.