PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Gallardo: The regime’s obsession with this kid is starting to come off as gay. I must say, all of it is beyond pathetic. By the...

  • asombra: As if anybody really gave a shit what Cubans want or think. Move along.

  • asombra: That’s OK. After making out like a bandit (literally), Reid doesn’t care who misses him.

  • asombra: Maduro’s face is so Latrine it hurts. I mean, Zelaya is hard to beat, but Maduro’s damn close.

  • asombra: Anyone who goes by “Donny” and speaks in fifth-grade language (if that) should not be talking about politics in a...

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Why Did Infamous U.S. Fugitive Promote Travel to Cuba?

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

Why Did Infamous U.S. Fugitive Promote Travel to Cuba?

The case of NSA fugitive Edward Snowden has various news sites recapping the lives of other infamous U.S. fugitives that have fled to Cuba.

Among these was Philip Agee, a former CIA officer, who would become a Cuban intelligence asset and reveal the identities of hundreds of U.S. agents throughout the world.

The summary below reminds us how, from 2000 until his death in 2008, Agee opened a Havana-based travel agency, named Cubalinda, which helped Americans skirt sanctions and travel to Cuba.

Why would Agee, a close collaborator of Castro's intelligence services, promote travel to Cuba?

Haven't "experts" assured us that travel to Cuba somehow hurts the Castro regime?

Or is this another one of those sophisticated "Jedi mind-tricks"?

From Fox News:

Philip Agee: A former CIA agent whose 1975 book "Inside the Company: CIA Diary," named American intelligence operatives and cited alleged misdeeds against Latin American leftists, Agee died in Havana in 2008 at the age of 72. While never prosecuted in the United States, Agee was denied a U.S. passport in 1987 over alleged links to Cuban intelligence. He lived underground in France and Germany, but in his later years spent most of his time in Havana, even opening a travel agency dedicated to helping Americans visit the island despite the U.S. embargo.

1 comment to Why Did Infamous U.S. Fugitive Promote Travel to Cuba?

  • asombra

    Oh, he's got "friend of Cuba" written all over him, no? Looks like a cross between Dan Rather and Walter Cronkite. Ugh.