PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Honey: Not everyone gets it wrong. Here is a press release from Don Adams of the Independence Foundation in PhiladelphiaL Hi Janet, Many...

  • Honey: Add to this that Tauck Tours and now I see Roads Scholars are taking people on tours (expensive for the primitive conditions...

  • asombra: Given Che’s views on the legal system, what kind of lawyer would hang his photo in his office?

  • asombra: Didn’t Rousseau look pretty? Should have been a romance novelist and left it at that.

  • asombra: The Gross business was always dubious, and now it stinks like rotting fish. Whatever sympathy I had for the man is gone.

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Why Did Infamous U.S. Fugitive Promote Travel to Cuba?

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

Why Did Infamous U.S. Fugitive Promote Travel to Cuba?

The case of NSA fugitive Edward Snowden has various news sites recapping the lives of other infamous U.S. fugitives that have fled to Cuba.

Among these was Philip Agee, a former CIA officer, who would become a Cuban intelligence asset and reveal the identities of hundreds of U.S. agents throughout the world.

The summary below reminds us how, from 2000 until his death in 2008, Agee opened a Havana-based travel agency, named Cubalinda, which helped Americans skirt sanctions and travel to Cuba.

Why would Agee, a close collaborator of Castro's intelligence services, promote travel to Cuba?

Haven't "experts" assured us that travel to Cuba somehow hurts the Castro regime?

Or is this another one of those sophisticated "Jedi mind-tricks"?

From Fox News:

Philip Agee: A former CIA agent whose 1975 book "Inside the Company: CIA Diary," named American intelligence operatives and cited alleged misdeeds against Latin American leftists, Agee died in Havana in 2008 at the age of 72. While never prosecuted in the United States, Agee was denied a U.S. passport in 1987 over alleged links to Cuban intelligence. He lived underground in France and Germany, but in his later years spent most of his time in Havana, even opening a travel agency dedicated to helping Americans visit the island despite the U.S. embargo.

1 comment to Why Did Infamous U.S. Fugitive Promote Travel to Cuba?

  • asombra

    Oh, he's got "friend of Cuba" written all over him, no? Looks like a cross between Dan Rather and Walter Cronkite. Ugh.