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  • asombra: Just keep repeating: “Venezuela can never be like Cuba…Venezuela can never be like Cuba…”

  • asombra: Let’s face it, there’s an AWFUL lot of people who will fall for BS, even blatant BS. This, of course, explains why...

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  • asombra: He should have called it totalitarian dictatorship, but what he said is better than “socialist regime.”

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realclearworld

Spain’s subservience to Cuba’s dictatorship

Juan Abreu's Emanaciones #1490 (my translation):

1490

In an interview today, Carromero says that Paya was murdered by Cuba's political police. Wow, incredible news. Anyone who is not an imbecile knows that Paya was murdered by the dictatorship. For me, the most important aspect of this political assassination -- which will remain unpunished -- is that the time to act is long gone. This is because the Spanish government committed itself to silence and to collaboration with the dictatorship to ensure the crime would not be investigated.

"It only took the Swiss ambassador 24 hours to go get Aron, who since the beginning had declared he could not remember anything [about the accident]. I was only able to meet with the consul months before my trial and never in private. There was always a Lieutenant Colonel there with us."

This paragraph from the interview allows us to appreciate the difference between a democratic government concerned about one of its citizens and a government whose only interest is to kiss the ass of the dictatorship's assassins and ingratiate itself to that dictatorship for shameful reasons. What other reasons could there be?

"Keep your mouth shut for the motherland," the Spanish government asked of Carromero.

"Shut up for the motherland!"

When it comes to the Cuban dictatorship, all you can expect from the Spanish government (be it on the right or left, deep down inside they are all the same cowardly pro-Castro trash) is vileness, fear, and the most despicable attitude possible.

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4 comments to Spain’s subservience to Cuba’s dictatorship

  • Rayarena

    Spain is a piece of shit. I went to Spain recently and I was disgusted. It's only three steps above your typical Latrine American country. It's full of graft and corruption, the people are lazy [there is no work ethic] and if it weren't for the European Union, especially Germany, Spain would still be steeped in backwardness and poverty like it was in the 1970's. No surprise that they are cowtowing to castro. He's turned Mexico and the rest of Latrine America into his bitches and he's done the same to Spain. Apparently, they like "machos" [or what they mistake as "machos"] smacking them around.

  • asombra

    Yes, when it comes to failing or screwing Cuba, Spain is the worst offender--and the competition is mighty stiff. Spain wins it because its moral failure is greater than anyone else's, since its obligation and historical connection to Cuba are also greater, by far. It's really an appalling situation, and the more one analyzes it the worse it looks. The only way to "make sense" of it is to accept that, to Spain, Cuba was always just a piece of property, an object to be used at will for Spain's benefit, without regard for what Cubans might want or what would be best for them. That attitude, which is centuries old, is evidently still in force, certainly for practical purposes. It's as if Spain feels it has some sort of "droit de seigneur," whereby it gets to screw Cuba because it has the right, and if it has such a right, then of course it's entitled to exercise it, and there's no guilt or wrongdoing involved. As self-serving rationalizations go, it's a pretty good one.

  • Rayarena

    Asombra,

    I absolutely agree with everything that you said, excellent analysis, but let me add something. In every case of child abuse, there is always one child that is singled out for additional abuse. In the case of our dear mother country, Spain, and her daughters, Cuba is that child that is abused more than the others. Somehow, perhaps becaue Cuba was the last [and let me add brightest] jewel in her once glorious crown, the struggle for independent by Cuba hurt our dear mother the most. It pained her more than say the lost of Honduras, Guatemala or even much larger Mexico, Peru or Argentina. Cuba was her ever faithful daughter that she could rely on, that would support her [in fact Spain derived more wealth from Cuba than it did from all of the gold that it took out of Mexico and Peru]. But Cuba ran off with that upstart, the USA, and the "love" our dear mother showered on us [chic] turned to red hot hatred.

    Along comes castro--and so bereft is Spain of national heroes--that they have adopted him as a national hero, since his father was a Spanish soldier that came to Cuba to fight for the crown. They see him as a vindicator that not only pokes the upstart, USA, in the eye, but also is willing to stomp on those horrible, ungrateful Cubans [read this as subjects which is how they always see us] and put us in our place.

    Such is the sick relationship between Mother [Spain] and daughter [Cuba]. Truly worthy of serious psychoanalytical intervention and massive medication.

  • asombra

    Spain fought much harder and invested much more to keep Cuba than any other colony. Cuba was a veritable cash cow--the "sugar bowl of the world." Spain took losing Cuba VERY hard--the island had been much more high-yield and productive of revenue than Spain proper. The loss even gave rise to a popular saying in Spain that's still in use: when somebody's whining about some material loss, someone else will go "más se perdió en Cuba" (more was lost in Cuba). Of course, this was accompanied by anti-Americanism which remains very much alive. But I don't think Spain went from loving to hating Cuba, which it had never really loved in the first place. It was more a version of "don't get angry; get even," and it's been "getting even," alright.