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realclearworld

Human rights in Cuba the theme of new play in New York City

Via The Jersey Journal:

Hudson playwright's theme is human rights in Cuba

jjxaperez0830.jpgLocal playwright and director Alex Perez’s 15-year journey to find his roots has blossomed into a new play coming up in New York.

Perez — who was born in Jersey City, grew up in Union City and lives in North Bergen — found out while researching his Cuban family’s history that his grandfather was held as a political prisoner.

“It opened up my ears and eyes,” said the 39-year-old. “In the late 60’s, there were these camps that Fidel Castro put aside for anybody he deemed unfit for society. They’d live in prison cells and work in labor camps.

“I fell in love with the human rights issues in these stories and newspaper clippings and wanted to write a fable representing the voices of the people,” he said.

The result is “Julian and Romero,” a tale of two young Cuban men set in one of these camps. One of them is a communist soldier under Castro’s revolution and the other a closeted gay man. While the two were best friends growing up, they are now at odds with each other’s beliefs.

Perez hopes the play educates audiences about important social and political issues.

Continue reading HERE.

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