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realclearworld

So when did the Cuban Missile Crisis become a U.S. “Victory?”

nixonnixon2khrushchev_and_kennedy

Regarding his preference in U.S. negotiating opponents, Khruschev's face says it all.

That Khrushchev swept the floor with Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis was the mainstream conservative conclusion throughout much of the Cold War. Richard Nixon and Barry Goldwater, for instance, represented opposite poles of the Republican establishment of their time.

“We locked Castro’s communism into Latin America and threw away the key to its removal,” growled Barry Goldwater about the JFK’s Missile Crisis “solution.”

“Kennedy pulled defeat out of the jaws of victory,” complained Richard Nixon. “Then gave the Soviets squatters rights in our backyard.”

Generals Curtis Le May and Maxwell Taylor represented opposite poles of the military establishment.

“The biggest defeat in our nation’s history!” bellowed Air Force chief Curtis Lemay while whacking his fist on his desk upon learning the details of the deal.

“We missed the big boat,” complained Gen. Maxwell Taylor after learning of same.

“We’ve been had!” yelled then Navy chief George Anderson upon hearing on Oct. 28, 1962, how JFK “solved” the missile crisis. Adm. Anderson was the man in charge of the very “blockade” against Cuba.

“It’s a public relations fable that Khrushchev quailed before Kennedy,” wrote Alexander Haig. “The legend of the eyeball to eyeball confrontation invented by Kennedy’s men paid a handsome political dividend. But the Kennedy-Khrushchev deal was a deplorable error resulting in political havoc and human suffering through the America’s.”

Even Democratic luminary Dean Acheson despaired: “This nation lacks leadership,” he grumbled about the famous “Ex-Comm meetings” so glorified in the movie Thirteen Days. “The meetings were repetitive and without direction. Most members of Kennedy’s team had no military or diplomatic experience whatsoever. The sessions were a waste of time.”

But not for the Soviets. “We ended up getting exactly what we’d wanted all along,” snickered Nikita Khrushchev in his diaries, “security for Fidel Castro’s regime and American missiles removed from Turkey and Italy. Until today the U.S. has complied with her promise not to interfere with Castro and not to allow anyone else to interfere with Castro.

Our friends at The Blaze help disseminate items utterly unknown outside Miami-Dade.

2 comments to So when did the Cuban Missile Crisis become a U.S. “Victory?”

  • asombra

    JFK looks odd in that middle photo. The hair looks like he's had a permanent; the eyes look glazed over, and the smile looks more fake than Nikita's (and certainly weaker). Khrushchev, of course, was beyond vulgar--I've seen homeless winos look classier. Still, he didn't seem as cold and soulless as Putin does, but then again, Putin wasn't KGB for nothing.

  • asombra

    What JFK did with Cuba in the Missile Crisis is pretty much the same, in essence, as what Ted Kennedy did with Mary Jo Kopechne in Chappaquiddick. A family thing, apparently.