PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • asombra: Sometimes the faux general looks almost convincing. Still, I prefer his Marjorie Stoneman Douglas mode, which is more honest.

  • asombra: Just another bad Negro unworthy of Massah Castro. Move along.

  • asombra: First, consider the source of the “criticisms.” They’re all screened, vetted and confirmed regime lackeys who...

  • asombra: Wait, isn’t that how Castro, Inc. portrayed Berta Soler in a cartoon?

  • asombra: How about we trade Bill Clinton for Gross? There could even be a Nobel Peace Prize in it for him.

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

“Give capitalism a chance to change Cuba,” CNN’s Fareed Zakaria consults the shamans on the Cuba “Embargo”

time-suspends-fareed-zakaria-for-plagiarism

From his website: "Fareed Zakaria hosts CNN’s flagship foreign affairs show, is Editor-at-Large of TIME Magazine, a Washington Post columnist, and a New York Times bestselling author. Esquire Magazine called him “the most influential foreign policy adviser of his generation.” And here he starts his latest CNN screed:

Remember, the United States does not have diplomatic relations with Cuba, and has a tight trade embargo in place against the island nation. So, many wondered whether this handshake was the beginning of a great shift in policy:

In fact: In executive order after executive order, President Obama has already abolished President Bush’s travel and remittance restrictions to Castro’s terror-sponsoring fiefdom and opened the pipeline to a point where the cash-flow from the U.S. to Cuba today is estimated at $4 billion a year. While a proud Soviet satrapy Cuba received $3-5 billion annually from the Soviets. In brief, for many years since Obama took office more cash has been flowing from the U.S. to Cuba than used to flow there from the Soviets at the height of their Cuba-sponsorship.

In fact: In 1958 with Cuba under a "U.S.-backed dictator," with the U.S. "controlling Cuba's economy,” (according to the media, though in fact, U.S. companies employed on 7 percent of Cuba’s workforce) the staff of the U.S. embassy in Cuba numbered 87, including Cuban employees.

Today with supposedly no diplomatic relations with Cuba (according to the media) the staff of the U.S. Interest Section in Havana numbers 351 including Cuban employees.

Fakaria continues: Let's begin by asking whether the existing policy is working. In 1960, the United States enacted an embargo against Cuba. Its purpose was simple and explicit: regime change. Did it work? Well, until he retired from the presidency in 2008, Fidel Castro was the longest serving head of government in the world. Surely that's about as powerful evidence as one can get that the policy did not work and is not working.".....

In fact: here’s an excerpt from the speech Secretary of State Dean Rusk gave to the Organization of American States at Punta del Este Uruguay on January, 21, 1962 initiating the sanctions against Cuba. "The United States objects to Cuba's activities and policies in the international arena not its internal system or arrangements." Note that here is not a single word-or even an inference-that the “embargo's” goal was to “dislodge Castro. Indeed, Secretary Rusk went out of his way to stress that this was not the embargo's purpose. In brief, in Cold-War parlance the goal was more containment than rollback.

Fakaria continues:

The best path forward for Washington is one that has been recommended by many experts, from Jorge Casteneda, the former Mexican foreign minister to Human Rights Watch. The United States should shift from a policy of regime change in Cuba, which has not worked, to one that promotes reform and human rights aggressively.

Jorge Castandeda was outed as a Castro spy years ago.

More from Fakaria:

"President Obama should offer the Cuban government a series of steps that would relax restrictions on trade and travel with Cuba – but only if they are matched by real economic and political reforms in Cuba."

A. Sure. And how's that Alan Gross thing working out?

So regarding the foreign policy recoomendations by "the most influential foreign policy adviser of his generation" Fakaria starts by citing three bogus premises--and concludes with a recommendation from a long-outed Castro spy!!!(Jorge Castaneda)

castaneda_spy_frame80pctfidellaugh2

You can't MAKE this SHIT up! In what other field of international study would such error, mendacity (and who knows what else) by a plagiarizer quoting a spy receive such "respectable" attention?!

3 comments to “Give capitalism a chance to change Cuba,” CNN’s Fareed Zakaria consults the shamans on the Cuba “Embargo”

  • asombra

    Yes, because India has shown SUCH solidarity with the oppressed Cuban people. Because someone from India can speak with SUCH moral authority to those whose oppressors India has both condoned and supported. Because Cubans are so worthless that they should be grateful when anybody even notices they exist. Really, we should leave everything to foreign "experts" on Cuba and what's best for Cubans. After all, Chihuahuas are just yappy little dogs nobody takes seriously; we should simply accept that and STFU.

  • asombra

    How about giving Cubans a chance to change Cuba? Or is that too straightforward for an "intellectual," especially one so brilliant he'd resort to plagiarism? Hey, Zakaria, why don't you try working for Joe Biden, another "brilliant" plagiarist, and leave the Cuba matter to people who actually give a shit, huh? Sheesh.

  • asombra

    And of course, Gandhi would have succeeded in Cuba just like he did in India. In his dreams.