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realclearworld

Enslaved Cuban doctors sold to Brazil by Castro regime facing dangerous work conditions

A report from Martí News:

Cuban doctors in Brazil: Dangers, work-related stress and 7% of their salary

Due to the dangers involved, no one wants to practice family medicine in certain shanty towns or “favelas” in São Paulo. The authorities turn to Cuban doctors.

Cuban doctors arrive at Brasilia International Airport.

Capão Redondo is one of the poorest, most violent districts in the outskirts of Sao Paulo.  For more than a year, a doctor has been needed  in that area of  “favelas” for the Unidad Basica de Salud Jardim São Bento (Jardim São Bento Basic Health Unit) , but  “no one wants the job due to the dangers it entails and that’s the reason why they turn to the Cubans doctors,”  according to a report titled  “ Los doctores del pueblo,” (The People’s Doctors) published by the Spanish newspaper El Pais.

El Pais correspondent Talita Bedinelli, followed surgeon Luciana Defendi Navarrete, a graduate of the Universidad de Montemorelos in Nuevo Leon, Mexico, to the health center. She works in Brazil with the Programa de Salud de la Familia (Family Health Program), a program that provides treatment and health education to low-income families.

According to Bedinelli, the program, which has 1,103 doctors in São Paulo, would need another 200 doctors in order to treat the district’s population. To deal with the deficit, the Brazilian government created the initiative Programa Mas Medicos (More Doctors Program), that offers jobs to foreign doctors.  The majority come from Cuba, thanks to an agreement between both countries that allows the Cuban authorities to keep part of the salary of the participating doctor.  According to the article, the deal generated much controversy in Brazil and the first group of Cuban doctors was greeted at the airport by angry Brazilin doctors yelling “slaves.”

[...]

At least the doctors from other countries are well paid for the work conditions they encounter.  But Cuban doctors, even though they earn more than on the island, receive less money than their counterparts from other nations.

In an article about an interview with Cuba’s Health Minister, Roberto Morales Ojeda, the Folha de o Paulo newspaper published the following:

“While the participants of the Mas Medicos program from other countries receive a monthly  salary of 10,000 reales (4,400 dollars) and can bring family members to Brazil, Cubans cannot  bring theirs and earn receive only 800 to 900 reales a month (about 300 dollars).  The rest of the salary is divided between the employees’ family on the island and the Cuban government, which keeps the larger share.”

Read the entire report HERE.

1 comment to Enslaved Cuban doctors sold to Brazil by Castro regime facing dangerous work conditions