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The Five Worst Things About Ecuador

In the Washington Free Beacon, Daniel Wiser lists the top-five worst things about Ecuador, and guess which Latin American Castro-Communist puppet dictator is #1?

The Five Worst Things About Ecuador

Observers wondering who would assume the mantle of Hugo Chavez as Latin America’s fiery, anti-American strong man did not have to wait long. That man is Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa.

Correa won a second term last February and promised to continue his “citizens’ revolution.”

However, his record looks different beyond the rhetoric. More than half of Ecuador’s 15 million people still live in poverty. Crime rates remain high. And journalists, members of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and indigenous inhabitants are routinely fined and arrested.

As the world awaits the birth of true democracy and freedom in Ecuador, the Washington Free Beacon compiled the five worst things about the country’s government:

1. Rafael Correa

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa / AP

Correa’s tenure as Ecuador’s strongman-in-chief has been surrounded by charges of corruption and nepotism. The Miami Heraldnoted that his cousin was forced to resign from the nation’s Central Bank after he was found to have lied about having an economics degree. Additionally, Correa’s brother received nine-figure government contracts—with the knowledge of the president.

Correa has tried to distract from his own personal ethical lapses by attacking foreign businesses. Correa has stood by a 2011 Ecuadorean court decision to award villagers $18 billion for pollution from an oil field formerly owned by Texaco, a company that has since been bought by Chevron. However, the Economist has noted that Ecuador’s government already reached a settlement with Texaco in 1998. The field is now owned by state company Petroecuador.

When the Free Beacon reported last month that Correa’s government had ties to a Spanish anti-piracy firm that has sought to remove videos posted by Chevron on YouTube, he tweeted an image that called this news site “corrupt.” Chevron alleges that the plaintiffs’ lawyers in the oil field case bribed the judge who issued the $18 billion award.

Correa has said “the world is extremely hypocritical, and the logic that prevails is not that of justice, but power.”

2. Repression of the media

Correa sings during his weekly live broadcast (AP)

Owners of the Ecuadorian newspaper El Universo were found guilty of defamation in 2011 and received three-year prison sentences and fines of $40 million.

While Correa later said he would pardon the El Universo owners and forgive the fines, his government passed a law last year that forbids the “deliberate omission of … topics of public interest” and “lynching by media,” according to the president of Ecuador’s congress.

The press watchdog Fundamedios reported more than 170 cases of verbal, physical, or legal harassment against Ecuadorian journalists in 2012. Byron Baldeon, a freelance photographer and witness in a criminal case involving alleged police corruption, was shot 17 times by two gunmen in 2012.

Correa has publicly said he does not subscribe to “the Anglo-Saxon view of human rights” and has called the media “corrupt, mercantilist … ink-wielding contract killers.”

Continue reading HERE.

1 comment to The Five Worst Things About Ecuador

  • asombra

    Can this prick manage a respectable presidential expression? Looking like you're getting head is NOT respectable, not even for Bill Clinton. Sheesh.