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realclearworld

Beating up the blind

Our good friend Jay Nordlinger in National Review Online:

Beating Up the Blind

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_sW65ilskOC8/SrjLZthFnRI/AAAAAAAAafs/8C41KQNtuNU/s400/JayNordlingerHyattRegency.jpgThis week, I am writing about David Horowitz, and the second installment of our series, “A Witness,” appears today. (Here.) Horowitz cast his first Republican ballot in 1984. It was for President Reagan, who was running for reelection against former vice president Walter Mondale. Horowitz voted for Reagan, he explained, “because he was opposing the efforts of the Sandinista Marxists to turn Nicaragua into a socialist gulag like Cuba.” Horowitz further explained, “I had supported Fidel; I wasn’t going to make the same mistake twice.”

Fidel is still in charge, as he has been since 1959 — even if he has given his equally wicked brother, Raúl, a newly prominent role. Readers of my columns are well familiar with Juan Carlos González Leiva, the lawyer and human-rights activist in Cuba. He is one of the bravest, most admirable people I know of. (Blind, by the way.) If the commanders of our culture — in the news media, in Hollywood, and in academia — did not feel so tenderly toward the Cuban dictatorship, González Leiva would be famous. As the heroes in apartheid South Africa were.

Last week, the Castros’ police beat the hell out of González Leiva and his wife, Tania Maceda Guerra. This is perfectly routine in that island paradise — the place where Mayor Bill de Blasio and his wife honeymooned, the place where Jay-Z and Beyoncé celebrated their most recent wedding anniversary. (This was a few months after Beyoncé sang — lip-synched — at President Obama’s inauguration.) The police pummeled a blind man with their fists, as his hands were tied behind his back. Then they choked him till he passed out. There was the wife, too, of course. Blind men and girls. What a lovely system this is. (For a report on the latest incident, go here. Several others were beaten as well, including a deaf man.)

Continue reading HERE.

1 comment to Beating up the blind

  • asombra

    From one of Nordlinger's pieces on David Horowitz:

    He [Horowitz] makes the Left hugely uncomfortable, for instance in his use of the words “we,” “us,” and “our.” A sample: “The results of our defense of the Cuban revolution are indisputable. Cuba is an island prison, a land of regime-induced poverty, of misery and human oppression greater by far than the regime it replaced.” Who on the left could stand to hear that?