PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Gallardo: “…is bad news for an island trying to improve its economy” Sure, till this day there is no market economy...

  • Griffin: In addition to the high suicide rate and low birthrate, Cuba also has the highest abortion rate in the Western hemisphere. Add...

  • asombra: Cubans on the island procreate just fine. They just abort the consequences in record numbers. I will never forget, a few years...

  • asombra: As for Fidel, nice biceps, no? Sheesh. Talk about delusions of hotness.

  • asombra: Even if (repeat, IF) this clearly wet-behind-the-ears NON-CUBAN “Latino” person is writing in good faith (which is...

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Correa Regime Attacks Press in Ecuador

ap-correa1

Venezuela is not the only place in Latrine America where freedom of the press is threatened.  Ecuadorian president Correa is doing his utmost to stifle objective reporting and to silence all critics.

Add this one to the list too.

From The Miami Herald:

A tale of two hacks: Ecuador’s continued assault on the press

BOGOTA, Colombia -- Two days after Christmas, masked and armed police raided the home of Fernando Villavicencio in the predawn hours, hauling away a lifetime of data and documents.

Hours later, President Rafael Correa said Villavicencio — an opposition advisor who also writes about corruption and the oil industry — was suspected of hacking into the president’s email.

Ten days later, Ecuador’s state-run El Telégrafo newspaper wrote about a proposed online media outlet that is seeking funds in the United States, including with the National Endowment for Democracy — whose Cold War origins and “democracy building” efforts have made it a bogeyman in the Americas.

There was one problem with the El Telégrafo story: According to Martha Roldos, a former legislator and government critic who was pitching the idea, the only way the paper could have had access to the information was by hacking her email.

The twin “hacking” stories shed light on the small Andean nation that has been hounding the independent press even as it builds one of the most sophisticated state-run media apparatuses in the Americas, behind Venezuela and Cuba.

Correa, a U.S.-educated economist, has repeatedly called the media his “greatest enemy” and has leveled multimillion-dollar lawsuits against those who cross him. This week, as he celebrated his seventh year in power, there were no signs of a truce.

And if the allegations of government hacking are true it would mean the administration’s media war is getting dirtier.

Continue reading HERE.

Comments are closed.