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realclearworld

Venezuelan Newspapers Face Shutdown

Maduro - Newspaper - 2

Add this one to the list.  It looks as if Maduro's regime is deliberately preventing opposition newspapers from buying the paper they need.

From Committee to Protect Journalists:

Venezuelan economic controls lead to newsprint shortage
By John Otis/CPJ Andes Correspondent

Although nearly all Venezuelan newspapers have websites, many of their readers like to get their news the old-fashioned way: on paper. But that's getting tougher every day amid a critical shortage of newsprint.

Some Venezuelan newspapers have been forced to reduce their size and circulation. Others have stopped their printing presses.

Venezuela does not produce newsprint. Nearly all of it is purchased from Canada and the United States by Venezuelan import companies or by individual newspapers. But due to government currency controls, securing dollars to buy that paper can take months. Reserves of newsprint have fallen to an all-time low, according to news reports.

Many Venezuelan journalists say they believe this is a deliberate strategy by the socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro to muzzle critical voices.

"It's a way to stop newspapers, to make them afraid of the government, and to reduce their importance because most newspapers are independent and critical. And the government doesn't like that," Miguel Henrique Otero, editor of the Caracas daily El Nacional, told CPJ.

Continue reading HERE.

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