PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • asombra: Yes, Carlos, the world is full of shit, and Cubans would be entitled to hold most of it in contempt–if only so many Cubans...

  • asombra: Kerry’s face is dysmorphic, like he’s got a medical syndrome. But facial weirdness aside, I have no problem with him...

  • Honey: Castro Si, Israel No! It’s chickenshit for Israel and praise for Castro. So what else is new with this administration? And...

  • Rayarena: As I always say, we Cuban Americans have really dropped the ball. We can’t expect our adversaries, our enemies to have...

  • asombra: Practically all “Latin” America is a mess; it’s just that some parts of it are messier than others.

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Cuban soils yield less rice and beans than 5 years ago

Adriel Reyes on the never-ending advances of the Cuban "revolution."

Via Martí News:

Cuban soils yield less rice and beans than 5 years ago

In the last 5 years, Cuban soils yielded 25% less citric while cocoa dropped to less than half of its previous production.

Workers in a market offer products in Havana (Cuba).

Recent research about the yielding of agricultural products in Cuba over the last five years determined that there has been a decrease in rice, beans and corn--all extremely important dietary products for the average Cuban citizen.

Taking 2007’s production as reference, rice production in 2012 decreased by 15% in tons yielded per hectare (approximately two acres).  Corn decreased by 21% and beans decreased by a hundred pounds for every half ton of beans harvested.

Rafael Pérez, a farmer from Yateras, stated that his farm does not yield as much as before and although he farmed an extra acre to compensate for the decrease in production, “the poor soil doesn’t help and the plants look weak and sickly."

Cuba's Statistical Yearbook shows that during the last five years, sugar cane yielded 4% less than what it produced before when cultivated in the same amount, and the land now yields 60% less when compared to harvests of a mere quarter of a century ago.

According to recent official statistics, more than 70% of Cuban farming soils show an acute degradation due to erosion, acidity, salinity, low organic content, decreased fertility and deficient drainage. 

Continue reading HERE.

Comments are closed.