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realclearworld

Cuba’s Castro regime and its North Korea troubles

John Suarez in Notes from the Cuban Exile Quarter:

Castro regime's North Korea troubles

As Maduro seeks to turn Venezuela into a Cuban colony trouble back in Havana...

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-e7G6TfgsBeA/UyESPQrhOuI/AAAAAAAAH08/uQfvY4MJFME/s1600/kyok.jpeg

Raul Castro with North Korea's Army Chief, General Kim Kyok-sik

Despite the CELAC spectacle in Havana, Cuba the Castro regime's outlaw credentials were reaffirmed in a damning report from the United Nations widely reported, on its role in illegal arms smuggling to its ideological soul mate: North Korea. According to the report in a side note "some of the ... parts could also meet the criteria defined in the list of ... technology related to ballistic missile programmes." Also reported the refusal of the Castro regime to cooperate with the investigation. The report clearly states in paragraph 70 and 74:

70. The Panel concluded in its incident report submitted to the Committee that both the shipment itself and the transaction between Cuba and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea were sanctions violations.

74. The Panel confirmed the route of the Chong Chon Gang was from Cuba to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. The voyage plan and other ship’s documents show that the vessel departed from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on 11 April, refuelled at the Russian port of Vostochny between 11 and 17 April before sailing to Havana via the Panama Canal. No records show the ship stopping at any countries other than Cuba between exiting the Panama Canal on 1 June and its return passage on 11 July.

Continue reading HERE.

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