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realclearworld

On Gabo’s Passing

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

On Gabo's Passing

Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 87, died last night at his home in Mexico City.

Known as "Gabo," he was one of the most popular and talented Latin American novelists of our time.  His writings include the epic 1967 novel, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Love in the Time of Cholera.

They also include Chronicle of a Death Foretold and Autumn of the Patriarch, both with strong political undertones and stinging critiques of Latin American dictators.

Unfortunately, Gabo's criticism spared dictators of the left.

His intimate friendship with Latin America's longest-serving, deadliest and only totalitarian dictator, Cuba's Fidel Castro, was legendary.

Throughout his life, Gabo's condemnation of dictators always stopped short of Havana, where he was provided a home with all of the privileges and luxuries denied to ordinary Cubans.

His double-standard became emblematic. It is practiced today by some of Latin America's leaders, including Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and Uruguayan President Jose Mujica -- all of whom were once themselves victims of military dictatorships and scorned those who coddled their repressors.

Yet inconceivably, these Latin American leaders now coddle the sole remaining military dictatorship of the Americas.

Goodbye Gabo. 

May your literary legacy live forever.

But close an unfortunate chapter in Latin America's ideological double-standard.

5 comments to On Gabo’s Passing

  • Gallardo

    One less communist piece of shit.

  • Luis3939

    La Opinion's Pilar Marrero praising GABO. Anti-American Mouthpiece

  • asombra

    Inconceivably? Not at all. It's eminently Latrine. As for his literary legacy, that doesn't concern me one way or the other, and I sure as hell have better things to read. What should definitely live forever is the infamy of his brazen hypocrisy and the fact he had no trouble getting away with it--and make no mistake, those who condoned, let alone shared, his grotesque double-standard are not much better than he was, assuming they're better at all. If they'd been able to get as close to Fidel as he did, it's quite possible that they'd have played the same despicable game. Furthermore, those who "understood' and accepted his Fidel crush would NOT have tolerated any comparable crush on a right-wing dictator. They know it, and we certainly do, just as we know they're ipso facto hypocrites themselves.

    Still, when it's all said and done, there have been worse cases of sacred cows getting away with blatantly two-faced BS as if that were perfectly legitimate, and not just involving Cuba (which everybody knows can be screwed over at will with both impunity and profit). One Nelson Mandela comes to mind.

  • asombra

    Photo caption: "Gabo, I'd let you blow me again, because I know how much it means to you, but really, you're old and ugly, which is anti-erotic, and I can get much fresher meat. Maybe you can work something out with Raúl, and I'll still give you credit just the same."

  • "make no mistake, those who condoned, let alone shared, his grotesque double-standard are not much better than he was, assuming they are better at all. If they'd been able to get as close to Fidel as he did, it's quite possible that they'd have played the same despicable game."

    Asombra, IMO you've just stated the root problem undermining western civilization, and in my mind the blame lies squarely on "baby boomers", my generation. It's all about celebrity, think Andy Warhol. Oh how good it felt to just stick it to the establishment... Understandable in say 14-20 something year olds, but then???? What is there to do? Grow up and accept responsibility or just hate everything your parents, in this case, the well-earned moniker, "Greatest Generation", stood for and destroy everything they built. The truth is, IMO, rather than just admiring their parents and their greatness, they were never ever able to grow up and accept that nothing in their lives would ever live up to those opportunities of greatness that challenged their parents. So the resentment festered as a boil... They were wrong of course, our generation has had numerous opportunities to prove the steadfast committment to our founders vision, and they've shirked every single one. They've tossed aside the responsiblity to defend and protect our freedom. So now we live in a society with no morals, no God,no truth, and increasing denial of freedoms. Yes, youthful rebellion is the norm in every generation, to a greater or lesser degree. Normally, in the US, these "rebels" would go off to college, the military, or the work force, and grow up. What happened with the angry, privileged baby boomer youth? Soon to wallow in being long-haired, bearded, entitled, selfish, drug depraved, demanding free everything "rebels". What a generation of cowardly fakes! Who or what speared them on into a life of eternal adolescent rebellion? The ones glorified in the media, of course. Fidel, Che, and company. Those oh so exciting, glamorous long-haired "rebels" in Cuba. Never mind the executions. Doubt this? Find photos of early 1960's campus "rebels" (Bill Ayers and friends) recently returned from service as Venceremos Brigadistas in Cuba. Personally, in regards to our freedoms, I believe we lost the war when Obama won the election. Some say Cuba is hopeless, well, IMO, so is the U.S. It's the same war, and contrary to what many think, I do not believe people in Cuba are more cowardly than those here, not in this time. I won't be here, but someone should document how things are in 2069 or so.