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realclearworld

Author Gabriel Garcia-Marquez loved Castro more than the Cuban people

(My new American Thinker post)

By any measurement, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez was a literary giant.  He wrote some wonderful books and was hailed as one of the all time greats of Spanish literature.

We definitely agree with many of the compliments and obituaries, such as this one from CBC:

"Garcia Marquez, who died Thursday at age 87, was eulogized in a brief ceremony Monday evening in the dramatic art deco lobby by the presidents of both Mexico and Colombia, two countries linked by the writer through his birth, life, heritage and career.
Though he was born in Colombia, Garcia Marquez lived in Mexico for decades and wrote some of his best-known works here, including One Hundred Years of Solitude."

My biggest problem is that Garcia-Marquez was just a bit too fond of Fidel Castro, the longest running dictatorship in the Americas.  He never called for elections in Cuba and was just a bit too quick to repeat the dictatorship's talking points, such as blaming the US embargo for the economic problems.

Didn't Mr Garcia-Marquez know that Colombia, his native country, and Mexico, his adopted nation, do business with Cuba? Again, the problem is not the US embargo but the failed socialist and communist policies that turned Cuba into an impoverished island, the same one that had to reschedule its debts over and over!

Sadly, Mr Garcia-Marquez is part of a Latin American left that has always loved Castro a lot more than the Cuban people.  They love having "rum and cola" with Castro and overlook the plight of the political prisons or the lack of freedoms.

Didn't Mr Garcia-Marquez know that Castro puts people in jails for writing against his regime?  Was he that misinformed about Cuba?

Over the years, I've gotten into many debates with Latin American leftists over Cuba.

I've come to the conclusion that many of these leftists hate the US so much that they are willing to support any one as long as he is "anti-Yankee"!

RIP Mr Gabriel Garcia-Marquez.   Shame on you for embracing of Fidel Castro.

P. S. You can hear my discussion about Garcia-Marquez with Cuban-American author Victor Triay plus young Colombia conservative Michael Prada & follow me on Twitter @ scantojr.

3 comments to Author Gabriel Garcia-Marquez loved Castro more than the Cuban people

  • asombra

    I'm sorry, but this is giving the SOB way too much benefit of the doubt. There isn't ANY doubt.

  • raddoc

    I wonder if any of the pundits that praised Marquez for being such a literary genius ever read his work? I am an avid reader and back in the 80's tried to slog through "One Hundred Years of Solitude". It was more like "one hundred minutes of misery". POS book.

  • asombra

    It doesn't matter how good "Gabo" was in purely formal literary terms. Life is not about literature; it's about reality, and his literature has had BAD consequences in real terms. Carlos Eire has touched upon this and so have others, but the whole ethos of the much-vaunted "Latin magical realism" is, in effect, a refusal to deal with reality squarely and effectively, a dodge, an evasion, an excuse, a crutch--a perversion. It's both a symptom of the chronic "Latin" disease and a contributor to it. Pathology is pathological no matter how well it may be packaged or presented or how cleverly it may be constructed. We're talking sickness here, which matters far more in real life than art.