PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Ziva Sahl: The uniforms remind of my high school marching band uniforms back in the day. Students picked one from the collection that was...

  • asombra: Gee, I wonder what those red stains on Nosferatu’s hand could be. Take a guess. Somehow, Lady Macbeth comes to mind:...

  • asombra: Those guard costumes, er, uniforms keep getting tackier, but the hats are a hoot. Of course, they have to be RED. Heaven forbid...

  • asombra: Now, now; I expect he likes guava pastelitos, or is ready to claim he does, which of course makes him OK. Seriously, if Reno was...

  • Humberto Fontova: Welcome to the Twilight Zone, Rosita Paya. http://babalublog.com/2014/03/ 07/welcome-to-the-twilight-...

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Russia and Cuba join together to oppose internet freedom

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XNHRy6y8kJ8/URiAYyJpscI/AAAAAAAAABU/l7gawfSNZCw/s1600/censor.jpg

Via The Hill:

Russia, Cuba oppose Internet control, surveillance agreement

While most countries are signing on to a new agreement on Internet governance, Russia and Cuba have pushed back, according to U.S. officials.

The nonbinding agreement was drafted at NETmundial, a meeting in Brazil this week that brought together representatives from governments, the tech industry and civil society to discuss Internet governance issues.

[...]

The nonbinding agreement developed at the meeting lays down basic Internet governance principles — such as free speech, privacy rights, security and protections for the Internet companies that connect people online — and calls for a global approach to Internet governance and oversight.Specifically, the transition of oversight over the Internet’s Web address system, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), away from the U.S. government “should be conducted thoughtfully with a focus on maintaining the security and stability of the Internet, empowering the principle of equal participation among all stakeholder groups and striving towards a completed transition by September 2015,” the document said.

The agreement also addresses government mass surveillance, saying it “should not be arbitrary or unlawful,” a standard that the U.S. government “is very comfortable” with, according to Scott Busby, deputy assistant secretary of State.

That principle is “consistent with standards that have already been articulated in international law,” he said.

“There is nothing groundbreaking new here in terms of mass surveillance or surveillance generally.”

Some countries, including Russia, Cuba and India, raised concerns about the agreement, according to Ambassador Daniel Sepulveda, the State Department’s coordinator for international communications and information policy. Russia and Cuba in particular have supported language allowing governments to block certain content.

Read it all HERE.

You must be logged in to post a comment.