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realclearworld

Some images from Cuba, B.C. (Before Castro)

Just a reminder from the folks at Bacardi that Cuba was a very different place before the Kingdom of Castrogonia was established in 1959 .

Some of us remember it all too well.

As Bacardi's new advertising campaign puts it: Some people get kicked out of parties, some get kicked out of their own country.  Or something like that...

You can find more of these posters HERE.   Take a look and take a break from all the bad news.  Make yourself a Jaiból (highball) while you're at it.

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6 comments to Some images from Cuba, B.C. (Before Castro)

  • But the gal at top don't look Lateeena to me? Looks like she don't even TAN! She looks Celtic!

  • Rayarena

    Humberto, you took the words out of my mouth! Those people cannot be Cubans. They are not PEOPLE-OF-COLOR.

  • asombra

    Alas, Bacardi was part of the problem, until it had no choice but to "see the light," and by then it was too late. Instead of putting its money and influence behind a rational, mature, professional solution to the Batista problem, meaning a political solution to a political problem, Bacardi went for the ultimately juvenile and infinitely riskier "revolutionary" option, which happened to be headed by the worst possible elements. Everything that could go wrong DID go wrong, and then some. Bacardi had plenty of company among Cuba's "oligarchs," the ones who were at best useful idiots and also backed the "revolution," in effect buying the rope later used to hang them. Nostalgia is all very well, but to me Bacardi symbolizes all that was wrong, or all that was disastrously stupid, with Cuba's big-money class.

    This reminds me of the story of a very rich Cuban who gave five thousand dollars to the democratic political opposition to Batista after he had already given fifty thousand to Castro and his people. He apparently wanted to hedge his bets, but obviously he was betting heavily on the wrong horse. How could a BS artist who came from a highly dysfunctional family, who'd never worked for a living, who had zero political experience, and who had an unsavory track record as, in effect, an armed hoodlum, possibly have gotten ANYWHERE with the Cuban people in general and the upper and middle classes in particular? Is this what "magical realism" means? Galloping infantile idiocy?

  • Jorge Ponce

    Thanks, Carlos, for sharing these excellent posters. I insist on drinking only Bacardi Rum when I go out or when I am with friends in my house. In fact, I have a Bacardi poster hung in my bar area. Good taste!

  • "Is this what "magical realism" means? Galloping infantile idiocy?"

    In a word; YES! (and I'm stealing the line.)

  • Rayarena

    "How could a BS artist who came from a highly dysfunctional family, who'd never worked for a living, who had zero political experience, and who had an unsavory track record as, in effect, an armed hoodlum, possibly have gotten ANYWHERE with the Cuban people in general and the upper and middle classes in particular? Is this what "magical realism" means? Galloping infantile idiocy?"

    I've pondered that same thought many-a-times. How could anyone have fallen for that piece-of-shit with his histrionics, family history and filth? I think that part of it can be explained by the intense hatred that Cuba's middle and upper classes had for Batista. Face it, Cuba was a prosperous country with a burgeoning middle class, it was on the cusp of industrialization in 1959. For a country like Cuba--overwhelmingly European and with a sophisticated aristocracy many of whom descended from titled families, it was a humiliation to have a low-class, vulgar, non-white head of state who turned Cuba's progressive Constitution of 1940 into a sham. I think that the hatred that certain influential Cubans had for Batista blinded them to the transparent lies of castro. As my mother told me, nobody thought that the Americans would allow a communist beachhead 90 miles off their coast.

    Perhaps American involvement in Cuba over the years turned into an immature vassal-state of sorts that was far too reliant on them. As a nation, we weren't mature. We had to rely on ourselves and not rely on the Americans and that is exactly what we did.

    Then again, part of the problem is ourselves. Just look at the way that we have dropped the ball over and over again. Look at all of the divisions in the exile community with some millionaires willing to do business with castro even now. I firmly believe that if Cuban exiles had been intelligent, castro would not be in power today. 55 years into the tyranny and we still don't have an anti-defamation league, a public relations arm, a think tank, a publishing house or a newspaper that can publish our point of view. Our anti-castro artists [think of the late Reinaldo Arenas] have to beg and scrounge because we don't support them. We are not institution builders and that is a huge detriment to our aspirations for freedom.