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realclearworld

Cuba: Castro’s Newest Economic Non-Reform

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

Castro's Newest Economic Non-Reform

It's fascinating how foreign journalists, who are presumably neutral observers, can write these types of stories with a straight face.

In the latest episode of Raul "the reformer," the AP lauds a new measure that "gives state-run companies more autonomy."

Wow!  That sounds rhetorically impressive.

Except it means absolutely nothing, for they remain state-run-and-owned companies -- meaning that they remain 100% operated and owned by the Castro regime.

Moreover, it means that 100% of the proceeds remain in the hands of the Castro regime.

But why let the facts ruin a good (false) narrative.

For the next act, opponents of U.S. policy will now argue that this "reform" is another example of why we should lift sanctions -- for expanding trade and investment with Castro's monopolies will (somehow) "empower" the Cuban people.

No, really.

From AP:

Cuba gives state-run companies more autonomy

Cuba has approved several measures giving state-run businesses more autonomy.

The changes include giving government-run enterprises more leeway to conduct secondary commercial operations.

For example, a factory that specializes in canned vegetables could get into a side business such as candy-making or recycling.

Previously, such entities were mostly barred from doing anything outside of their primary activity.

They will also be allowed to sell any excess goods at market prices.

The measures published Monday in the government's Official Gazette say state companies can keep up to 50 percent of their profits, 20 percent more than before.

The changes are the latest in a package of reforms that seek to revive Cuba's weak economy.

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