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realclearworld

In Cubazuela, the devil is in the details…

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... and you know the devil has become highly visible when an influential member of the Castro-friendly Council on Foreign Relations can spot him.

Postcards From Venezuela

by Moisés Naím, in The Atlantic

MoisesNaim4

First postcard: “On March 5, when the restaurant where he worked on the outskirts of Caracas closed due to nearby protests, Moisés Guánchez, 19, left to go home. But he found himself trapped in an enclosed parking lot near the restaurant with around 40 other people, as members of the National Guard fired teargas canisters and rubber bullets in their direction. When Guánchez attempted to flee the lot, a guardsman blocked his way and shot toward his head with rubber bullets. The shot hit Guánchez’s arm, which he had raised to protect his face, and he was knocked to the ground. Though Guánchez offered no resistance, two guardsmen picked him up and took turns punching him, until a third approached and shot him point blank with rubber bullets in his groin. He would need three blood transfusions and operations on his arm, leg, and one of his testicles.”

Second postcard: “José Romero, 17, was stopped on March 18 by national guardsmen when he was coming out of a metro station in downtown Caracas. A guardsman asked to see his ID and, when Romero presented it, slapped him across the face. Romero was detained without explanation and taken to a non-descript building, where he was held incommunicado, threatened with death, beaten, and burned.”...

...The most important clash in today’s Venezuela is not that of left versus right, rich versus poor, socialism versus capitalism, or those who sympathize with the United States versus those who repudiate it. It is between those who defend a government that violates human rights as a state-sanctioned policy and those who are willing to sacrifice themselves to stop it. Apologists and boosters in the U.S. and around the world for Hugo Chávez and his Bolivarian Revolution need to acknowledge they are defending a militarized government that routinely violates human rights. It is impossible to reconcile liberal values with support of the government now in power in Venezuela.

Read on...Worthwhile reading: the entire article can be found HERE

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