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realclearworld

¡A la cola!: Reaping what the Cubazuelan Chavistas have sown

food-line-in-venezuela-san-cristobal-2

Venezuelans in San Cristobal line up for scarce food

Been there, done that.

Told you so.

It's Déjà vu all over again.

You should have seen it coming.

What did you expect?

Yeah.  All that.   It's like a broken record in a Cuban exile household, all this hectoring of Venezuelans.

Here is what every Cuban knows all too well: "21st century socialism" is nothing but thinly disguised communism.

And the inevitable outcome of communism  is always the same, everywhere: it makes everyone equally poor and totally dependent on the whims of the government.

Food rationing is one of its most prominent vicious cycles: tight central planning and lack of free market competition lead to insufficient productivity in every sector of the economy, everything has to be rationed, and the rationing becomes one of the most efficient means of controlling the populace.  With no incentive to work other than some vapid ideology, the populace produces less and less and suffers ever greater deprivation, and ever increasing dependency on the few crumbs distributed by the repressive state.  As productivity dwindles and the country as a whole sinks into poverty, trade with the rest of the world dwindles too, and everything becomes ever scarcer.  Some items disappear altogether. Those who don't accept their rations gleefully are given even less or are thrown into prison.

A majority of Venezuelans voted Chavez into office several times, believing that Chavismo and "21st century socialism" would create Utopia.  Most recently, a small majority voted Maduro into office, still believing that those Chavista promises could really bring about justice and prosperity.

Well, here are the results.  Get used to your dystopia.  And get ready for even worse shortages and worse repression.  You still have privately-owned businesses.  Wait and see what happens when the state owns every store, every farm, every factory.

Unless you kick out the Castronoids and Chavistas in your midst, this is your future as citizens of Cubazuela.

5f227ce478dace960f17345f4cbfb96e

Fistfights amid long bread lines in Venezuela

(CNN) -- Shoppers in Venezuela know that shortages of staples like cornmeal, milk and chicken are a harsh reality of life, but now -- amid violent protests and strikes -- shortages have spread to that most basic of basics: bread.

Lines are forming, and fights have broken out outside bakeries as politicians and business leaders point fingers.

In recent days, people have had to wait in line for hours under the scorching sun. Ricardo Rodriguez, a Caracas resident waiting for the chance to buy bread, described the queues as "extraordinary."
"It's like embarking on an odyssey," he said.

The problem stems from labor, social unrest and currency regulation that ties to difficulties importing raw ingredients, according to Tomas Ramos Lopez, president of the Venezuelan Federation of Bread Producers...

...The government blames the shortage on unscrupulous merchants and bakery owners who hoard their products in order to make a profit by selling at higher prices on the black market.

But Ramos said, "I believe that the national industry and the laws in Venezuela have to be changed. (Government officials) need to know the difference between hoarding and having inventory."

Continue reading HERE.

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