PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • asombra: Brazil and Castro, Inc. are partners in keeping Cuba under totalitarian tyranny and in screwing over the Cuban people....

  • asombra: And I’m sorry, but “Yoaxis” and “Yordanis”? Yikes.

  • asombra: Carlos, you mean some Protestants, because the “official” ones have long been in the regime’s pocket.

  • asombra: Taking the NYT for naive IS naive. The NYT knows exactly what it’s doing–it’s been at it for over 50 years.

  • asombra: The Clintons, in their appalling vulgarity, fakeness and ambition, are just a reflection of sociopolitical degeneracy....

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Castro dictatorship ends internet censorship in Cuba… accidentally… it’s blocked again

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0PxrmGblYMY/UCAI0aepDlI/AAAAAAAABcw/uCnvEBznMb8/s400/imagesCAR5HY36.jpg

Juan Tamayo in The Miami Herald:

Cuba ends censorship — NOT

For a brief and shinning moment, it seemed that Cuba had unblocked access to several websites censored for years because of their criticisms of the government, including the U.S. government’s Radio/TV Marti.

And it wasn’t even April Fools’ Day.

On Thursday afternoon, Cuba’s Web surfers began noticing that they had access to Radio/TV Marti; Cubanet in Miami, which publishes work by independent and dissident journalists; and the Spain-based Cubaencuentro, also critical of the government.

Also unblocked were Twitter, Skype and Revolico, a portal for Cuban classified ads blocked apparently because it competes with state-run stores on the island nation, according to several Havana residents and Miami contacts.

The Raúl Castro government never said a word, and Cuba watchers began wondering whether Havana had taken a step forward in allowing more freedom of information in the Communist-ruled island nation.

Nope.

By Friday afternoon, the blocks were back in place, and there were unconfirmed reports that their brief removal had been the result of a mistake on the part of a Cuban government technician.

“Everything seems to indicate that it was an error,” wrote Alejandro Ulloa, who first reported the lifting of the blocks, in a tweet Friday around 5 p.m. “In other word, yes, these sites are prohibited for Cubans.”

Comments are closed.