An Apology for Cuba’s Military Dictatorship

When is a military dictatorship not a military dictatorship? When that ruthless military dictatorship happens to be the poster boy for leftist academia.

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

An Apology for Cuba’s Military Dictatorship

American University Professor William LeoGrande has provided us with a text-book example of how to apologize for Cuba’s military dictatorship.

He writes in The Huffington Post:

Today, eight ministries are led by career military officers, three of whom are still on active duty. Of the 10 vice-presidents of the Council of Ministers, five are active-duty or former career military officers, not counting Raúl himself. Of the 13 members of the Political Bureau of the Cuban Communist Party, four are active-duty generals and another is retired military, again not counting Raúl.

Both in Cuba and abroad, the prominence of so many senior officers in civilian posts has prompted speculation about a military ‘takeover’ of the Cuban government. But to regard this circulation of elites as breaching some clear divide between civilian and military roles is to misunderstand the nature of civil-military relations in Cuba.”

That’s right.

Never mind that Castro’s military exerts totalitarian control over Cuba — both in political and economic terms.

Cuba is not a military dictatorship, says Professor LeoGrande.

Never mind that the bureaucratic proportions he cites stymie those of the military juntas that ruled throughout Latin America in the 60s, 70s and 80s — which at least tried to (poorly) hide behind the civilian puppets they’d parade as figure-heads.

Yet, Cuba is not a military dictatorship?

Then again, LeoGrande also believes that “Raúl Castro became president of Cuba in his own right in 2008.”

In some alternate universe perhaps.

One thought on “An Apology for Cuba’s Military Dictatorship

  1. Of course it’s not a military dictatorship. Most of these old farts aren’t real military, let alone real generals, starting with Castro II.

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