PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Rayarena: I wonder if the decision to turn down Muslims might not have something to do, also, with the fact that Muslims are quite...

  • Rayarena: Just for the record, the link is working now. That said, for anyone interested, La Condesa de Merlin who was a member of the...

  • asombra: It’s a new book about the life of the Countess of Merlin, of Cuban origin, who later became a well-known figure in...

  • Rayarena: I think that your link is broken. I clicked on to your hyperlink of the recording of your interview, but I got one of those 404...

  • asombra: Fighting back tears, eh? Have they ever shed a tear for the victims of the regime Tokmakjian helped maintain for over 20 years?...

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

Reports from Cuba: There’s No Room, Wait Outside

By Julio Cesar Alvarez in Translating Cuba:

There’s No Room, Wait Outside

HAVANA, Cuba — Doctors working in the clinic located within the gatehouse of Central Havana Children’s Hospital refused medical treatment to a three-month-old infant named Alexander because his parents refused to comply with an internal policy of the hospital.

The policy allows only one parent to be present in an exam room. According to the doctor and nurse on duty the lack of space in the rooms is the reason for this policy.

According to Dr. Mario Lorenzo Medina, vice-director of health care at Central Havana Children’s Hospital, overcrowding in the consultation rooms was the reason why only one of the parents could be present.

“My doctors don’t have the room. They work in crowded conditions,” the director told the infant’s father.

For the parents — 25-year-old Yanela Durán Noa and Augusto César San Martín, an independent journalist — this policy violates the right of both parents to be present during an examination of their son.

The director of the hospital politely acknowledged this right but said that the policy would remain in effect until working conditions for his doctors improved. If parents refuse to comply, they are denied access to an exam room.

Dr. Giselle from the Coco and Rabí clinic in the 10th of October district is of the opinion that the rights of the parents trump any other consideration, especially a hypothetical lack of space.

http://www.translatingcuba.com/images/miscposts/1403535856_enfermera-que-negocc81-la-asistencia-300x200.png

The nurse who denied medical assistance. Photo courtesy of the author.

“The patient is always right. There is no significantly compelling reason to deny him care,” says Giselle.

For the father, not only was the directive an embarrassment, but so too was the treatment by the clinic’s medical and nursing staffs.

“They didn’t even ask why we brought the child in. The doctor and nurse refused to treat him. And when I asked for their names in order to file a complaint, they rudely told me that I was not the police,” says Augusto César San Martín.

Cuban doctors travel to inhospitable locations in order to provide medical care in very difficult conditions.

While on these international “missions,” they work in open-air exam rooms under conditions of both sun and rain. They do this without objection and without a word of complaint. Even snakes pose no barrier to their work overseas.

The parents in this case consider denying them entry because of an alleged lack of space to be absurd since the policy is followed even when the rooms are empty.

Alejandro’s parents filed a complaint with the Ministry of Public Health almost two months ago. They have yet to receive a reply.

http://www.translatingcuba.com/images/miscposts/1403535857_perro-en-consulta-300x200.png

Photo: A dog sleeping in one of the clinic’s exam rooms.

Cubanet, June 23, 2014, Julio Cesar Álvarez

Comments are closed.