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realclearworld

Putin, Cuba, and Propaganda Ploys

Via Capitol Hill Cubans:

Putin, Cuba and Propaganda Ploys

Under international scrutiny for his illegal incursions and hostile acts against the Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin arrived in Havana yesterday, where he was warmly received by Cuban dictators Fidel and Raul Castro.

The first propaganda ploy of the trip was to announce that Russia would forgive 90 percent of Cuba's $32 billion debt to the former Soviet Union.

That's nice, except the Castro regime has never recognized that debt and it was never going to be paid. Thus, Putin has forgiven a whole lot of nothing.

The second propaganda ploy was to announce that Russia would re-invest the remaining 10 percent ($3.5 billion) into development projects in Cuba.

That's nice also, except for the caveat: That Castro's bankrupt regime would have to first pay Russia the $3.5 billion, plus 10% interest. Not going to happen either.

Yet, Reuters writes that "both measures inject much-needed foreign investment into Cuba."

How exactly?  Apparently, only Reuters knows.

The third propaganda ploy was to announce that Putin would help Castro revive his defunct offshore oil exploration ambitions.

Just like former Vice-President Dick Cheney warned of the Chinese drilling for oil off Cuba's shores last decade -- and thus advocated for U.S. companies to do the same -- former U.S. Senator Bob Graham and others will pick up a similar mantle warning of the Russians.

And the choir of anti-sanctions lobbyists will follow.

Never mind -- as we correctly predicted then and do so again -- that it remains commercially and logistically unfeasible.

Bottom line: This trip is about propaganda and a sobering reminder that the world's rogue regimes stick together (and do harm together).

In the last couple of years alone, Castro's regime has supported Assad's genocide in Syria; has supported a nuclear Iran; has led the dismantling of democracy in Venezuela; and has illegally smuggled weapons to North Korea.

In the same fashion, it has supported Putin's illegal annexation of the Crimea and stands by the violent actions of his separatist commandos in the Ukraine.

Thus, Putin goes to Havana to propagandize and say thanks.

That's what rogues are and that's what rogues do.

4 comments to Putin, Cuba, and Propaganda Ploys

  • asombra

    "Castro's regime has supported Assad's genocide in Syria; has supported a nuclear Iran; has led the dismantling of democracy in Venezuela; and has illegally smuggled weapons to North Korea." Yes, but it still poses no threat to the US, as Ana Belen Montes always maintained. Only hysterical paranoid types like "those people" would ever claim otherwise. You know, like they claimed the Soviets had nuclear missiles in Cuba despite heated denials from JFK's crackerjack team of "the best and the brightest." The fact they turned out to be correct was just a lucky coincidence, naturally.

  • asombra

    Well, I suppose we should be more understanding. Castro, Inc. is bound to miss the old days, when it could get by with being Russia's bitch and didn't need to chase after money from Latrines or Cuban exiles. Things were much easier and simpler then, and the USSR was an excellent host for the Cuban parasite (which always intended to suck that teat for all it was worth in exchange for as little as possible, except maybe young Cuban lives like those wasted in Africa, which were considered expendable anyway and far less valuable than actual money). Ah, nostalgia.

  • asombra

    Brazil reportedly spent 12 billion on the World Cup. Cuba can borrow that 3.5 million from Dilma to pay Putin. Easy as pie.

  • asombra

    I meant 3.5 billion, but it makes no difference. Cuba wouldn't pay either way. Parasites only take; they never pay.

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