PINAR DEL RIO


support babalú


Your donations help fund
our continued operation

do you babalú?

what they’re saying


bestlatinosmall.jpg

quotes.gif

activism


ozt_bilingual


buclbanner

recommended reading





babalú features





recent comments


  • Humberto Fontova: Le ZZZUMBA!!! (not the suicide rate–but the accolades to Castrosim from “The Best and Brightest”...

  • asombra: Brazil and Castro, Inc. are partners in keeping Cuba under totalitarian tyranny and in screwing over the Cuban people....

  • asombra: And I’m sorry, but “Yoaxis” and “Yordanis”? Yikes.

  • asombra: Carlos, you mean some Protestants, because the “official” ones have long been in the regime’s pocket.

  • asombra: Taking the NYT for naive IS naive. The NYT knows exactly what it’s doing–it’s been at it for over 50 years.

search babalu

babalú archives

frequent topics


elsewhere on the net



realclearworld

More on Russia’s reopened spy base in Cuba

Via the Business Insider:

Everything We Know About The Huge Spy Base In Cuba That Russia Is Reopening

Screen Shot 2014 07 21 at 8.20.08 AM

Moscow and Havana have agreed to reopen a Cold War-era signals intelligence (SIGINT) base in Lourdes, Cuba.

An agreement was reached during Putin's visit to Cuba last week to reopen the base, Russia business daily Kommersant reported last week. That was confirmed by a Russian security source who told Reuters: "A framework agreement has been agreed."

The base was set up in 1964 after the Cuban missile crisis had brought the U.S. and Soviet Union close to confrontation over Moscow's proposal to place nuclear weapons on Cuban soil.

Havana shut it down in 2001 because of financial issues and American pressure.

Located south of Cuba's capital Havana and just 150 miles from the U.S. coast, the base left many parts of the U.S. vulnerable to Soviet communication intercepts, including exchanges between Florida space centers and U.S. spacecraft.

Here's what a Congressional report from 2000 said about the facility:

  • The Secretary of Defense formally expressed concerns to Congress regarding the espionage complex at Lourdes, Cuba, and its use as a base for intelligence directed against the United States.
  • The Secretary of Defense, referring to a 1998 Defense Intelligence Agency assessment, reported that the Russian Federation leased the Lourdes facility for an estimated $100 million to $300 million a year.
  • It has been reported that the Lourdes facility was the largest such complex operated by the Russian Federation and its intelligence service outside the region of the former Soviet Union.

Continue reading HERE.

Comments are closed.