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realclearworld

Brain teaser of the day: Ivy League Cuba “expert” interviewed by CNN. Guess how it goes.

ChurchCuba

Prof. Dominguez (left) and Castrogonia's Minister of Ecclesial Affairs

Ay!

Nothing new here.  This is but another example of the  bias of the vast majority of articles on Cuba and of the  "expert" opinions constantly cited by the mainstream media.

The interview appears in Fareed Zakaria's GPS web site and was conducted by one of his interns, Kevin O'Donnell.

CNN's interview with Professor Jorge Dominguez of Harvard is lengthy.  If you're interested in seeing the front-loaded questions and predictable answers for yourself, go HERE.

If you're interested in seeing a small sample of the obvious slant of this interview, here's one for you.

Call it exhibit A :

So what’s the risk of setting up a situation much like the inequality in the 1950s that led to the Cuban Revolution?

The particular risk is less that, and more that it might end up like Chinese investments in Africa where the Chinese have gone without thinking through in sufficient detail about the social side effects of some of their investments, resulting in some nasty episodes. Cuba does have significant mining resources, principally nickel, some others as well, so that would be perfectly attractive for China.

Oh, and let's not leave out the heavily loaded title of the article.

Call this exhibit B:

How to View a Changing Cuba
The face of "changing" Cuba

The face of "changing" Cuba

 

 

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