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  • asombra: Can you say gerontocracy? I can, and spell it, too. And notice the token Negroes–in the back rows, of course.

  • asombra: In the photo with Smith, look how seedy, bogus and disreputable Fidel looks–a cheap, vulgar poseur. But yes, nearly all of...

  • Gallardo: Putting the Reagan era aside, USA has always been Castro’s best friend. The bloody con-artist owes USA for paving his way...

  • asombra: The New York Times is practically wetting itself over Castro, Inc.’s Ebola PR stunt. Same perverse shit, different day.

  • asombra: Myers looks like a snotty prick who tried to be too clever by half and was merely USED. Foolish tool.

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realclearworld

It’s not the message, it’s the fellow in The Oval Office

 

The implications of ending the embargo on Cuba’s apartheid Castro dictatorship

The University of Miami's Dr. Jaime Suchlicki in the Institute for Cuban and Cuban American Studies' Focus on Cuba:

http://ctp.iccas.miami.edu/FOCUS_Web/Focus_Title.jpg
Implications of Ending the Cuban Embargo

If the U.S. were to end the embargo and lift the travel ban without major reforms in Cuba, there would be significant implications:

  • Money from American tourists would flow into businesses owned by the Castro government thus strengthening state enterprises. The tourist industry is controlled by the military and General Raul Castro.
  • Tourist dollars would be spent on products, i.e., rum, tobacco, etc., produced by state enterprises, and tourists would stay in hotels owned partially or wholly by the Cuban government. The principal airline shuffling tourists around the island, Gaviota, is owned and operated by the Cuban military.
  • American tourists will have limited contact with Cubans. Most Cuban resorts are built in isolated areas, are off limits to the average Cuban, and are controlled by Cuba’s efficient security apparatus. Most Americans don’t speak Spanish, have but limited contact with ordinary Cubans, and are not interested in visiting the island to subvert its regime. Law 88 enacted in 1999 prohibits Cubans from receiving publications from tourists. Penalties include jail terms.
  • While providing the Castro government with much needed dollars, the economic impact of tourism on the Cuban population would be limited. Dollars will trickle down to the Cuban poor in only small quantities, while state and foreign enterprises will benefit most.
  • The assumption that the Cuban leadership would allow U.S. tourists or businesses to subvert the revolution and influence internal developments is at best naïve. As we have seen in other circumstances, U.S. travelers to Cuba could be subject to harassment and imprisonment.
  • Over the past decades hundred of thousands of Canadian, European and Latin American tourists have visited the island. Cuba is not more democratic today. If anything, Cuba is more totalitarian, with the state and its control apparatus having been strengthened as a result of the influx of tourist dollars.
  • As occurred in the mid-1990s, an infusion of American tourist dollars will provide the regime with a further disincentive to adopt deeper economic reforms. Cuba’s limited economic reforms were enacted in the early 1990s, when the island’s economic contraction was at its worst. Once the economy began to stabilize by 1996 as a result of foreign tourism and investments, and exile remittances, the earlier reforms were halted or rescinded by Castro.
  • Lifting the embargo and the travel ban without major concessions from Cuba would send the wrong message “to the enemies of the United States”: that a foreign leader can seize U.S. properties without compensation; allow the use of his territory for the introduction of nuclear missiles aimed at the United States; espouse terrorism and anti-U.S. causes throughout the world; and eventually the United States will “forget and forgive,” and reward him with tourism, investments and economic aid.
  • Since the Ford/Carter era, U.S. policy toward Latin America has emphasized democracy, human rights and constitutional government. Under President Reagan the U.S. intervened in Grenada, under President Bush, Sr. the U.S. intervened in Panama and under President Clinton the U.S. landed marines in Haiti, all to restore democracy to those countries. The U.S. has prevented military coups in the region and supported the will of the people in free elections. U.S. policy has not been uniformly applied throughout the world, yet it is U.S. policy in the region. Cuba is part of Latin America. While no one is advocating military intervention, normalization of relations with a military dictatorship in Cuba will send the wrong message to the rest of the continent.
  • Once American tourists begin to visit Cuba, Castro would probably restrict travel by Cuban-Americans. For the Castro regime, Cuban-Americans represent a far more subversive group because of their ability to speak to friends and relatives on the island, and to influence their views on the Castro regime and on the United States. Indeed, the return of Cuban exiles in 1979-80 precipitated the mass exodus of Cubans from Mariel in 1980.
  • A large influx of American tourists into Cuba would have a dislocating effect on the economies of smaller Caribbean islands such as Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, and even Florida, highly dependent on tourism for their well-being. Careful planning must take place, lest we create significant hardships and social problems in these countries.

If the embargo is lifted, limited trade with, and investments in Cuba would develop. Yet there are significant implications.

Continue reading The implications of ending the embargo on Cuba’s apartheid Castro dictatorship

Cuba boasts the largest hotel chains in Latin America

gaviotaMilitares-cubanos
(Shareholders annual meeting)

sala5


"Don't you hard-lining blockheads realize that opening Cuba to tourism will sweep away Cuban Communism?"

According to the top source on the matter (Hotels Magazine) Cuba's military-owned hotel chains--Cuba Gaviota, Grupo Cubanacan and, Grupo Hotelero Gran Caribe--nowadays comprise the largest hotel chains in Latin America, topping anything in Mexico.

Entire story in Spanish here.

According to Human Rights groups nowadays Cubans are suffering a near record wave of repression.

Rod-Serling

Imagine if you will....a place where academics, journalists, legislators, insurance magnates, Think-Tank fellows, and literally anyone with pretensions to intellectual superiority, relentlessly propound a theory more easily refuted than one maintaining that the sun revolves around the earth...

Imagine if you will...a place (in 2014) where the "best minds" relentlessly refuse to acknowledge the existence of observable data that refutes their dogma as devastatingly as Galileo's telescope refuted the religious dogma of his time (1609)...

galileotelebw

fid1aaaawseraul5

WaPo: Cuba should not be rewarded for denying freedom to its people

The Editorial Board of The Washington Post:

Cuba should not be rewarded for denying freedom to its people

http://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_1484w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2011/05/05/Obituaries/Advance/Images/castro-001.JPG?uuid=mLVROncdEeCg_Yae4_kf8w

THE OTHER day, Fidel Castro wrote an opinion column for Cuba’s state-run newspaper, Granma, as he has done periodically from retirement. He lavished praise on an editorial in the New York Times that called for an end to the U.S. trade embargo on Cuba. But Mr.?Castro had one complaint: The Times mentioned the harassment of dissidents and the still-unexplained death of a leading exponent of democracy, Oswaldo Payá, and a younger activist, Harold Cepero, in a car wreck two years ago.

The assertion that Cuba’s authoritarian government had yet to explain the deaths was “slanderous and [a] cheap accusation,” Mr. Castro sputtered.

So why has Cuba done nothing to dispel the fog of suspicion that still lingers over the deaths? If the charge is slanderous, then it is long past time for Mr. Castro to order a thorough investigation of what happened on an isolated Cuban road on July?22, 2012. So far, there has been only a crude attempt at cover-up and denial.

We know something about what happened, thanks to the eyewitness account of Ángel Carromero, the young Spanish politician who was at the wheel of the rental car that was carrying Mr.?Payá and Mr. Cepero to a meeting with supporters. Mr. Carromero, who visited Washington last week, told us the car was being shadowed by Cuban state security from the moment it left Havana. He said his conversations with Mr. Payá as they traveled were mostly about the Varela Project, Mr. Payá’s courageous 2002 petition drive seeking to guarantee democracy in Cuba. Many of Mr. Payá’s supporters in the project were later arrested and imprisoned.

After the wreck, Mr. Carromero was pressured by the Cuban authorities to describe it as an accident caused by his reckless speeding. But he reiterated to us last week that what really happened is that the rental car was rammed from behind by a vehicle bearing state license plates. Mr. Carromero showed us photographs of the damaged car, damage that seemed inconsistent with a wreck caused by speeding. But the precise details of what happened are unknown and need to be cleared up by a credible investigation. Mr.?Payá’s family has sought one for two years, without success. When the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States sent a query to Cuba about the case, they got no answer. Nothing.

The U.S. embargo has been substantially relaxed in recent years to allow hundreds of millions of dollars of food and medicine exports, in addition to consumer goods supplied to Cubans by relatives in this country. The question is whether a further relaxation is merited. The regime’s persecution of dissidents is unceasing; it continues to imprison American Alan Gross on false charges. While Cuba has toyed with economic liberalization and lifted travel restrictions for some, we see no sign that the Castro brothers are loosening their grip. Fully lifting the embargo now would reward and ratify their intransigence.

A concession such as ending the trade embargo should not be exchanged for nothing. It should be made when Cuba grants genuine freedom to its people, the goal cherished by Mr. Payá.

Forget Ebola. We have a crisis of leadership and confidence

 

Words of great wisdom from Norman “Those ruly repellent Miami Cubans” Birnbaum

birnbaumbirnbaum2
Back in 2006 our Ziva called our attention to an eminent scholar and Democratic party consultant (he "advised" the JFK, Carter, Ted Kennedy and Jesse Jackson campaigns) named Norman Birnbaum (seen in recent pic top left) who wore his anti-Cuban exile bigotry on his very shirtsleeves, not unlike Michael Moore:

"We have not attacked Castro because of mutual assured deterrence, his air force could attack nuclear power plants and make much of the US southeast uninhabitable so despite the truly repellent Miami Cubans of the older generation and their gallant allies, the Israel lobby, Castro hangs on"

A couple years ago Birnbaum also wrote a revelatory piece about his acquaintance (and convicted Castro spy) Walter Kendall Myers:

"Walter Kendall Myers, a former Foreign Service officer, has been sent to prison for life, and his wife for a lesser term, for espionage on behalf of Cuba. Enthusiastic about the Cuban revolution, Myers for years passed on to the Cuban government information he had acquired as an official of the State Department’s intelligence unit, in which he was a specialist for European affairs....I knew Myers slightly as an amiable and informed presence at Washington meetings and gatherings on European affairs, at embassies, foundations, universities. I thought well of him as someone who seemed relatively free of the usual clichés...

Castro, in secret, gave his American friend Myers medals. He would have done better to encourage him to retire from the Foreign Service and lobby for the Cuban tourist industry. "

Flippancy? Or Freudian slip issuing from Birnbaum's professional contacts and experience?

In light of the State Department's "inside knowledge" of Castroism going back to 1957 (and especially their brilliant countermeasures to protect U.S. interests) I'd say Birnbaum is spot on. Anti-embargo lobbyists probably help Castro much more than do his official spies--and have nothing to fear from the FBI. I mean with people like William Wieland, Roy Rubbottom, Wayne Smith, John Kerry, Fulton Armstrong, Phil Peters variously in State Dept. posts, why on earth would Castro need any official "agents" in the U.S. State Department?

wielandwayne-smith-fidelphil4kerry-harkin-ortega-450x333

EZRA144

"LE ZZZZZUMBA!!!"

Are Cuban doctors qualified to fight Ebola?

It is well known that medical standards in Cuba are much different than in the U.S. How many innocent Cuban doctors will pay the ultimate price left to die forgotten in Africa?

Capitol Hill Cubans:

Is Cuba Sending Unqualified Health Workers to West Africa?

The Cuban dictatorship is willing to sacrifice anything -- or anyone -- for the sake of propaganda.

This appears to be the case of the health workers it has sent to West Africa to work on the Ebola virus.

The details that have been filtering out of Cuba regarding the terms and conditions that the Castro regime has given to these health workers are very concerning.

For example, the Cuban health workers have been compelled to agree that if they contract the Ebola virus, they will not be repatriated to the island.

Moreover, they have been warned of a 90% chance of no return.

As such, there has been a life insurance policy taken out for these health workers with the World Health Organization (WHO).

Surely the families are the beneficiaries of the policies, right?

Nope -- the Cuban state is.

(It remains unclear whether the WHO is further paying the Castro regime for these health workers.)

Those fortunate enough to return have been "promised" nearly $10,000 per month -- to be deposited in a Cuban state bank account during their absence -- as well as a house and car.

This would set them up extremely handsomely -- for life -- in Cuba.

Of course, whether the Castro regime intends to actually fulfill this "promise" is another question. Just ask the veterans of Cuba's African wars.

Castro knows that Cubans are desperate enough to accept these terms. After all, there's at least a chance for survival if you contract Ebola, while there's no chance for survival if you're caught by sharks in the Florida Straits.

But it seems that the Castro regime is not counting on their return.

Adding to this concern is the fact that the Cuban health workers sent to West Africa appear to be poorly trained (at best) or utterly unqualified (at worst).

As the Wall Street Journal reported last week:

An Australian World Health Organization official responsible for training them on Ebola care watched in concern as the Cubans swapped hand-clasps, pats on backs and other potentially hazardous displays of physical affection. Public-health officials warn Ebola can spread on contact, with the virus carried in bodily fluids like sweat.

“They’re a very cuddly people,” said Katrina Roper, a technical officer with the U.N. agency. “Tomorrow will be me explaining why they have to stop shaking hands and sharing things.”

Such irresponsibility may only exacerbate the problem.

But hey -- sacrifice anything, or anyone, for propaganda.

Count Floyd’s Halloween countdown riddle: Fidel versus Adolf

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Count Floyd bids you a good morning.

Time for some reeeeally scaaaary Halloween fun, boys and girls!

Aaawoooooooooo!

Here's a super-super-scary riddle, inspired by the Miss Hitler contest in Russia.

This is scarier than my favorite bedtime story "Blood sucking monkeys from West Mifflin, Pennsylvania, " and far more relevant to world affairs than any story about all those poor Cuban suckers sent to the Ebola epicenter in West Africa:

Riddle me this, you elementary penguins: At the end of a zombie apocalypse, if there were only two zombies left on earth, who would win: Adolf or Fidel?

tumblr_ld64p5RBXT1qea5q4o1_500

 

Zombie_Hitler_by_ScottPurdy

Don't take this image of Lateeeeen-oh Democrat trick-or-treaters from the South Bronx as a hint....both of these battling zombies are great liars and propagandists....but....you know what they say about pictures being worth a thousand words....336147_4042378351239_1560969067_o

Let’s Add Obamacare to the List of Problems

 

Reports from Cuba: What isn’t working?

By Fernando Damaso in Translating Cuba:

What Isn’t Working?

Let’s take a look at four different situations.

In the case of the national railway, the authorities in charge claim that its problems are due to outdated equipment and the lack of proper maintenance resulting from a lack of spare parts. The system has not been updated in more than fifty years. As a result the No. 1 train from Havana to Santiago de Cuba, which used to run daily, now only makes the trip every three days. For the last eight years the Havana to Holguin train has not run at all.

Those that are running do so at reduced speed and with a fewer number of train cars. When the air conditioning in one of the French-made train cars breaks down, it remains permanently of service and passengers must resort to opening tiny windows instead. The system also suffers from organizational problems and widespread indiscipline.

For years the sizes of school uniforms sold at the beginning of the school year have not corresponded to students’ actual sizes, which have become much smaller to poor nutrition. Though the problem persists year after year, the ministries of education and industry have still not come up with a solution.

Camping, the only vacation option available to the average Cuban, does not live up to expectations or its costs. Camping facilities are run-down, the food is of poor quality and badly prepared, amenities are minimal and the available services leave much to be desired.

Drinking water is in short supply in the suburb of Villa Panamericana near the town of Cojimar. Planners did not take into account the fact that project’s cisterns relied on gravity and that the supply came directly from the tank itself, so of course it cannot reach the third, fourth or fifth floors of the town’s existing buildings.

One might think that this string of calamities is directly related to those provide these services. That assumes that these people do not know how to do the work or simply do it badly. However, in spite of a constant turnover of directors, administrators and personnel, things are no better. One would then have to assume that it is the system itself that is not working.

Neither classic nor actual socialism has worked in any of the countries in which it has been tried. The evidence is plain to see. In Cuba it has never worked, not in the past and not in the present. I think this will also be the case with “prosperous and efficient socialism.” At least that is how I see things so far.

Raul Castro’s desperate offensive

An excerpt from Carlos Alberto Montaner's editorial in Diario de Cuba (translated by Capitol Hill Cubans):

Raul Castro's Desperate Offensive

http://www.diariodecuba.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/large/image/raul181014.JPG

Raul Castro fears that Venezuela's subsidies will dry out in the short-term. He sees it coming. The price of oil is falling and the chaos generated by the absolute inefficiency of "chavismo" has Venezuela about to close the spigot. The Cubans selected Maduro, but he has turned out to be an absolute disaster. It's a question of survival. Two drowning people can't mutually save themselves.
Thus, the offensive. Raul needs, desperately, to be saved from the burning ship. What exactly does he need? A deluge of American tourists to flood his hotels with their fresh dollars. Today, they can't travel to Cuba. The law prohibits it. He also wants credits to import U.S. products. They sell him food and medicine, but he has to pay cash-in-advance and lacks dollars.

Raul Castro is not willing to change the system, nor tolerate freedoms, but he thinks he can change Obama and eliminate the restrictions imposed or maintained by eleven U.S. Presidents.

His hypothesis is that he'll succeed in doing so after the November elections, in the last two years of the Obama Administration. To achieve this goal, he has his entire intelligence services diligently working, along with a few exiles who subscribe to the strange and illogical rationale that the way to end Castro's tyranny is by endowing it with resources.

The main obstacle -- Havana believes -- is Democrat Senator Bob Menendez, Chairman of the important Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Therefore, Cuba's intelligence services concocted an operation to try to destroy him by creating a smear campaign that he had relations with underage prostitutes in the Dominican Republic. This was discovered to be a repugnant lie.

The tentacles of Castro's lobby are extensive. They reach Congress, the media, and the academic and cultural worlds. They infiltrated the Pentagon. The person who used to evaluate Havana's activities for The White House was senior intelligence analyst, Ana Belen Montes, a Cuban spy, captured in 2001 and sentenced to 25 years in prison. Since 1985 she had been spying for the Castros.

Scott W. Carmichel, the U.S. counter-intelligence agent who discovered her, believes there are many more spies placed and seduced by Cuba in various sectors of the U.S. government and civil society. He's probably right. And they are all working tirelessly to obtain Raul Castro's current objective.

Read the entire piece (in Spanish) HERE.

Miss Hitler versus Miss Che: Which beauty pageant would be best for the world?

Miss Hitler contestant Elena Bernatskaya

Miss Hitler contestant Elena Bernatskaya

Sponsor a Miss Hitler beauty contest and chances are you will get lots and lots of attention, all of it negative

See the evidence for yourself, in this article from Vocativ:

Who Will Be Miss Hitler 2014?
Who is the most beautiful anti-Semitic of them all? A Russian pro-Hitler online group wants to find out

There is an actual, real-life Miss Hitler contest going on right now. On VKontakte— Russia’s Facebook—Russian and Ukrainian Nazis and the people who love them, are voting for their favorite pictures of proud, beautiful anti-Semitic women posted to the site’s “Adolf Hitler” group page. Boasting more than 7,000 followers, the page describes itself as a group of Russians and Ukrainians who pay tribute to Hitler, history’s best-known goose-stepping genocidal maniac.

Miss Ostland 2014, as it’s called, is a social media pageant tribute to Ostland, the Nazi civilian occupation regime of the Baltic states in 1941 in which more than a million Jews were murdered. But Miss Ostland isn’t all about genocide. Actually, it’s more about “feminine beauty” than anything else.

Want to be 2014?s Miss Hitler? Here’s how you qualify:

1) Be a woman.

2) Be a Nazi.

3) Be a woman Nazi.

4) Be a woman who hates Jews.

5) Be a member of the “Adolf Hitler” VKontakte group.

6) Post a sexy Nazi pic.

7) Get other Nazis to like your pic.

8) Don’t insult other women’s pictures. Nazis are a lot of things, but they are apparently not catty on social media.

The woman whose picture receives the most likes will be declared the winner, and only group members can vote.

Continue reading HERE (Includes photos of the lovely contestants).

What do you think would happen if someone were to launch a Miss Castro pageant?  Or a Miss Che pageant (since El Coma Andante and his half brother are still alive it seems more adequate to feature a dead man as an icon of perfection).

Any negative press?  Not likely.  This contest would be a total propaganda victory!

So, why not start such a contest?  Leftists throughout the world could turn this into something bigger than Miss Universe or Miss World.  And imagine the interest such a pageant would spark in Latrine America!

A mere suggestion to those who are interested: Follow guidelines similar to those of the Miss Hitler pageant:

1) Be a woman.

2) Be a Communist or Socialist.

3) Be a woman Communist or Socialist.

4) Be a woman who hates all capitalists and property owners and advocates their total elimination.

5) Be a member of the “Che Guevara” fan club.

6) Post a sexy Communist/Socialist picture.

7) Get other Communists and Socialists to like your pic.

8) Don’t insult other women’s pictures. Communists and Socialists are not catty about each other on  social media -- only about bourgeois scum.

Go to it comrades!   The so-called news media of the world will love the story.  And maybe you can raise enough money to equip poor people everywhere with weapons for the ultimate "final solution."

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Dissident Cuban rapper ‘El Critico’ arrested and held since March 2013 sentenced to 6 years in Castro gulag

Where are Jay-Z and Beyonce when you need them?

Via Uncommon Sense:

Imprisoned Cuban rap singer 'El Critico' sentenced to 6 years in prison

ThAngel Yunier Remon, "El Critico"

Imprisoned Cuban rap singer/political activist Angel Yunier "El Critico" Remon has been sentenced to 6 years in prison. El Critico and several family members had been in jail since March 26, 2013, after they were arrested when a Castroite mob attacked them during an "act of repudiation."

The result of the case against El Critico, an activist with the Patriotic Union of Cuba, or UNPACU,  was never in doubt.

Also sentenced as part of the case were:

  • Alexander Otero Rodríguez, 5 years.
  • Rudisnei Villavicencio Figueredo, 4 years.
  • Yaquelin Garcia Jaens, a 4-year suspended sentence.

An Update on the ‘Reforms’ in Cuba

 

Reports from Cuba: Of jails in Cuba

By Ivan Garcia:

Of Jails In Cuba
https://desdelahabanaivan.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/un-combatiente-cuba.jpg?w=595

A “combatant” as Cuban prison guards are called, watches over prisoners working in their new uniforms.

For Saul prison is like his second home. He celebrated his 63rd birthday behind bars, fabricating cement and gravel blocks for a Cuban state enterprise called Provari, which makes everything from bricks, tiles and mattresses to insecticides and sells them for hard currency.

Saul knows the island’s penitentiary map like few do. Since 19 years of age he has been held in the main prisons: La Cabana, Chafarinas in Guantanamo, Boniato in Santiago de Cuba and the jails built by Fidel Castro like the Combinado del Este in Havana, Aguica in Matanzas and Canaleta in Ciego de Avila.

“In all, since I was a prisoner for the first time in 1970 because of the Vagrancy Law. I have worked cutting cane, in construction, making tourism furniture or insecticides with hardly any physical protection,” comments Saul, who has been a free man since April.

According to a former prison official, 90 percent of detainees in Cuba work with scarce security and are paid poverty wages.

“I am convinced that the work of prisoners is one of the main productive engines of the country. Exploiting them allows high profits. Until 2006, when I worked in a Havana jail, they were paid 150 or 200 pesos a month for working up to 14 hours (remember that the minimum salary in Cuba is 484 pesos) or they were paid not a cent. Those who were paid also had deducted expenses like food and lodging. The government gives degrading treatment to the majority of common Cuban prisoners,” says the ex-official.

Throughout the green alligator it is calculated that there exist more than 200 prisons. Cuba is the sixth nation on the planet in per capita prisoners. In 2013, the regime recognized that the penal population is around 57 thousand inmates.

The internal dissidence claims that the figure might approach 100 thousand. Cuban jails are rigorous. Physical mistreatment and abuses by the penitentiary guards are standard.

Suicides, mutilations and insanity within the prisons are a secret statistic that the government handles with clamps. Prestigious companies, like the Swedish Ikea, have been accused of complicity in prisoner slave labor in Cuban factories.

In the 1980’s, Ciro was a prisoner for five years for illegal exit. In his pilgrimage through the detention centers, he worked in a transportation parts warehouse for the Ministry of the Interior (MININT) in the Lawton slum, some 30 minutes from downtown Havana.

“MININT is the main beneficiary of cheap prison labor. In Workshop One I worked with hardly any protection on an assembly line for cars with plastic bodies and VW German motors. I also worked in an upholstery shop where fine furniture was given its varnish. Years later, I learned that they were for Ikea. They never paid me a cent,” says Ciro.

Thousands of inmates participate in construction of hospitals, schools, housing, food production and the most dangerous work. “We do what no one wants to do. Clean streets, sewers and cut the invasive marabou weed,” says Evelio, who is completing a two-year sentence scrubbing urban buses.

Military or state enterprises like Provari are at the head of labor exploitation and captive work. In a brochure published in 2001, the firm Provari was said to have 150 production installations on the island.

Continue reading Reports from Cuba: Of jails in Cuba