Pachanga in the White House

President Obama’s 2015 National Hispanic Heritage Month Proclamation addresses the contributions that “America’s Hispanic community” has made to our country. Therefore, one must ask why the President has opted to host Communist Cuba’s Buena Vista Social Club at a White House function tonight. One can draw only one conclusion, the President prefers to embrace Cubans from a Communist country rather that freedom-loving Cuban-Americans from the United States.

But the President can’t help himself. In the 2015 proclamation, he brags as one of his accomplishments the fact that “we are expanding the cultural, economic, and familial ties that so many Hispanic Americans share with Latin America by entering a new chapter of engagement and cooperation with Cuba.” Once again, the President shows no respect for freedom-loving Cuban-Americans.
And now you have an inkling as to why I dislike President Obama so much!

To read the 2015 White House proclamation, click on

Pope Francis, Dorothy Day, and Che Guevara

Pope Francis

Bombarded by the 24-hour news cycle on the Popemania, I was moved to listen to Pope Francis’ address to a Joint Session of the U.S. Congress on September 24, 2015.

Having said this, I must admit that I was not favorably inclined to listen to this Pope for his failure to rise to the occasion during his Cuban visit. He refused to meet with the Ladies in White and with other human-rights activists who have been fighting the oppression of the Castro regimes and religious persecution. He invoked “reconciliation” to the Cuban people — ignoring the fact that what they need is FREEDOM. The Pope’s demeanor in Communist Cuba was not that of a man of courage. His continued criticism of capitalism and his silence on communism show his biases and his preferred ideology.

When asked why he had not met with human-rights dissidents during his stay in Cuba, Pope Francis responded that “”It was very clear I was not holding private audiences in the nunciature — not even with other heads of state.” And, yet, Pope Francis did meet with Kentucky County Clerk Kim Davis at the Vatican Embassy in Washington, DC.  This provides more evidence where Pope Francis’ loyalties are – definitely not with democratic forces.

There are signs that Pope Francis offered us to let us know where his sympathies are.  By meeting with Fidel Castro, the Pope gave a pass to the former Cuban dictator who closed all Catholic schools and universities, as well as expelled 131 priests, brothers, and a bishop on a freighter bound for Spain in 1961.  According to the church’s statistics, the number of priests in Cuba decreased from 723 in 1960 to 220 in 1965. By reaching out to Fidel, Pope Francis betrayed the sacrifices of many Catholic youngsters who died at the hands of firing squads at La Cabaña prison to shouts of “Viva Cristo Rey.” Pope Francis sided with the key enemy of the Catholic Church in Cuba.

And here is yet another clue as to why I don’t trust Pope Francis. When he visited Bolivia, he accepted as a gift a Marxist crucifix from President Evo Morales — one shaped with the Communist hammer and sickle. It was Karl Marx who called religion the opium of the masses. Religion and communism are incompatible with each other, and, yet, Pope Francis said that he was not offended by Evo’s gesture. You see, Pope Francis remembers to talk about “politics” only when he is away from totalitarian-run countries. To him, the enemy of the people is capitalism, not communism!

Getting back to Pope Francis’ speech to Congress, I was glad when he mentioned leading civil-rights champions in our Nation’s history, like former President Abraham Lincoln and the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Both of these were Americans whom I have always admired.

But then, the Pope threw me a curve ball when he mentioned Dorothy Day. At first, I thought that the Pope’s lack of proficiency with the English language had triggered a mispronunciation of a famous American. I was certain that the Pope meant to recognize the popular actress of the 1950s and 1960s Doris Day. She was a favorite of mine, too.

On second thought, I thought that Doris Days did not belong next to the names of Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr., unless, she had done some momentous acts in our history that I was unfamiliar with. So, I went back and checked Doris Day’ biography, and I could not find any. Her fame was mainly in the film industry.

My first clue that helped me to solve my dilemma came when I heard that U.S. Senator and self-proclaimed socialist Bernie Sanders had left the House chamber beaming because the Pope had cited an American Catholic whom Sanders had plenty of praise of. The Senator indicated that the name “Dorothy Day has not been used in the United States Congress terrible often.” Sanders went on to say that “She was a valiant fighter for workers, was very strong in her belief for social justice, and I think it was extraordinary that he cited her as one of the most important people in recent American history. This would be one of the very, very few times that somebody as radical as Dorothy Day was mentioned.”

Now that I had the correct name, I did a bit of research on Dorothy Day. And I came up with one of Day’s famous saying during the 1970s:

“The two words [anarchist-pacifist] should go together, especially at this time when more and more people, even priests, are turning to violence, and are finding their heroes in Camillo Torres among the priests, and Che Guevara among laymen. The attraction is strong, because both men literally laid down their lives for their brothers. “Greater love hath no man than this.””

And, now, I am more convinced than ever as to why I admired Pope John II. Regarding Pope Francis, I am not a fan. Anyone who mentioned an American who looked up to Che Guevara cannot be a friend of mine or of freedom-loving Cuban-Americans.

Cuban-American Poet in Havana on August 14th

Marti Quote

The Obama administration asked Richard Blanco, the son of Cuban immigrants, to write a poem for the reopening of the U.S. Embassy in “La Obama,” Cuba, on August 14th, 2015. Blanco, who read his poem “One Today” at President Obama’s second inauguration, indicated that this second request “was the hardest and easiest poem I have had to write.”

It is shameful that Blanco has allowed himself to be manipulated by the Obama administration. Perhaps, Blanco is more interested in himself than in the plight of the Cuban people. Indeed, it is ironic that Secretary Kerry refused to invite Cuban dissidents to the official flag-raising ceremony at the U.S. embassy. It is the Cuban dissidents who deserve to read their poems at this official ceremony.

Blanco should be reminded of the words of Cuban Founding Father José Martí regarding visiting an enslaved Cuba:

“To set foot in the house of the oppressor is to justify the oppression. As long as a people have not conquered its rights, he/she who visits the house of those who trample on his/her rights to party and have a good time is an enemy of the people. “

If President Obama’s goal was to bring the Cuban and the Cuban-American closer together, he has failed miserably. Blanco’s actions have set them apart.


Policymakers should put the brakes on the one-sided rapprochement with Cuba

Excellent article from our friend Jason Poblete (@JasonPoblete on Twitter) at DC Dispatches:

Cuba Smiles, All the Way to the Bank

The President has demonstrated since December 17, 2014 that he is willing, even if it means ignoring the law, to press forward on the U.S.-Cuba question. Congress has been, mostly, missing in action. While the House moved appropriations product this month, most of it, in the unlikely event that it survives in conference, goes into effect in next year. Nothing has been done to stop the administration this year.

If Congressional had moved swiftly in early January to respond to the President’s December 17 proposed policy shift, it could have mounted a successful effort to keep Cuba on the state sponsors of terror list, where it belongs. Yet once that domino fell, without even a credible response, it gave the administration the green light it needed to proceed on several fronts to deconstruct U.S.-Cuba relations as well as the law and regulations that underpin it.

Thanks to US policy, before December 17, 2014 Communist Party hardliners were whistling past the graveyard. Now it has much-needed life support.

Meanwhile the Cuban Communist Party has been very busy racking up successes. In six months, with the assistance of the Obama administration and its legions of K Street lawyers and lobbyists, Cuba (1) was removed from the state sponsors of terrorism list; (2) opened a much-needed U.S. bank account; (3) eased U.S. sanctions in ways not seen since the late 1970s; and, most importantly for Cuban Communist Party leaders, (4) is well on its way to securing diplomatic recognition or, as Raul Castro likes to say, respect, from a long-time political foe.

And yesterday, as expected, Moody’s issued a press release stating that Cuba’s removal from the state sponsors of terror list was “credit positive” and, somewhat inexplicably, rates Cuba Caa2 with a stable outlook. Cuba has also reportedly reached an agreement with the Paris Club on its sovereign debt. The regime is just getting started and when the money and new financing begins to flow (a regional lender has already promised it may lend money), it will virtually guarantee a neo-Communist thugocracy for a few more years. This will make it much more difficult for Cuban resistance leaders to make a difference on the ground and it will afford fugitives from U.S. law, including terrorists, safe haven.

The new U.S.-Cuba reality has afforded the Cuban Communist Party breathing room in Cuba and around the world, especially in the Western Hemisphere. With the state sponsor of terror Scarlett Letter removed, Communist Party leaders have wasted no time making the most of its new found fortune. It was its green light it needed for the neo-communists to consolidate power, scramble to secure investors and financing, crack down on Cuban civil society, and violate human rights with impunity in ways not seen in Cuba in decades. The Russian and Chinese governments also see many new opportunities for mischief in the largest island of the Caribbean.

Contrary to what Cuba’s legions of beltway supporters argue, the mainstay of U.S.-Cuba policy is, as is stated in the law, remains and should be peaceful transition. The sanctions have been extremely effective even if they’ve been enforced half-heartedly by both Republican and Democratic administrations. We have a statutory roadmap in place, with clear benchmarks for Cuba that the President and the Congress are ignoring and, in some cases, using new regulations and attempting to pass new laws that will weaken the existing framework.

What is truly perverse about the last six months is how U.S. interests and values have been forgotten or ignored by the President and the Congress. Americans are owed billions of dollars by the Cuban regime for unlawfully confiscated properties, debt obligations, and recent judgments against Cuban officials for human rights abuses and, yes, murder and torture of Americans. With respect to human rights abuses, we are no longer engaging in the ‘support for the Cuban people’ as the law intended it to be.

Policymakers should put the brakes on the one-sided rapprochement and focus on putting U.S. interests ahead of sound bite politics. And U.S. companies that are allowed to do business in Cuba, should also pitch in by setting new standards of engagement– a voluntary Code of Conduct — that are consistent with U.S. better guarantee worker rights and defend property rights.

The Obama/Holder way: Get Menendez but say nothing about Chesimard

On Tuesday, our friend Alberto de la Cruz posted about the Wall Street Journal editorial on Senator Menendez.

It smells really bad, specially coming after Senator Menendez criticized the Obama administration approach to Iran, Cuba and Ukraine.

On the other hand, the citizens of New Jersey should know that the Obama administration has not been banging the table about Joanne Chesimard, a woman who killed a state trooper years ago.   In fact, the Castro dictatorship has said no:

“Cuba said Monday that it has a right to grant asylum to U.S. fugitives, the clearest sign yet that the communist government has no intention of extraditing America’s most-wanted woman despite the warming of bilateral ties.

Gov. Chris Christie has urged President Barack Obama to demand the return of fugitive Joanne Chesimard before restoring full relations under a historic detente announced by Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro last week.

Chesimard was granted asylum by Fidel Castro after she escaped from the prison where she was serving a sentence for killing a New Jersey state trooper in 1973 during a gunbattle after being stopped on the New Jersey Turnpike.

Asked if returning fugitives was open to negotiation, Cuba’s head of North American affairs, Josefina Vidal, told The Associated Press that “every nation has sovereign and legitimate rights to grant political asylum to people it considers to have been persecuted. … That’s a legitimate right.”

“We’ve explained to the U.S. government in the past that there are some people living in Cuba to whom Cuba has legitimately granted political asylum,” Vidal said.

“There’s no extradition treaty in effect between Cuba and the U.S.,” she added.

In a letter to the White House made public Sunday, Christie said Cuba’s asylum for Chesimard, who has changed her name to Assata Shakur, was “an affront to every resident of our state, our country, and in particular, the men and women of the New Jersey State Police, who have tirelessly tried to bring this killer back to justice.””

So let’s get Menendez but “silencio” about Chesimard.

Am I the only one who thinks that this is a bit strange?



‘The ship, the ship’

(My new American Thinker post)

In “Fantasy Island“, the old TV series, Tattoo would look up in the sky and say “The plane, the plane”.   It was an announcement that a plane carrying guests was about to arrive.

In the next round of U.S.-Cuba talks, we will hear someone say “the ship, the ship”, or a reminder that Cuba is still smuggling weapons.    

Click here for the post:

US-Latin America stories of the week with Fausta Rodriguez Wertz

GUEST:  Fausta Rodriguez Wertz, editor of Fausta’s Blog…

we will react to the speech by the Prime Miniser of Israel’s speech……the growing influence of Iran in Latin America…..more on the death of Mr Nisman in Argentina…..the continuing crisis in Venezuela……Colombia and the FARC……the ship with arms headed to Cuba plus the latest in US-Cuba talks…….click to listen:


Do Younger Cuban-Americans Think Differently Than Their Parents on Cuba?

Art Linares

There are many out there in fantasy land who justify the Obama/Castro Accord of December 17, 2014, by saying that a majority of Americans – and they put special emphasis on the younger members of the Cuban-American community – support the opening. 

Well, here is a speech by the Cuban-American Connecticut State Senator Art Linares (Republican) on his feelings and aspirations for the homeland of his parents and grandparents. He makes Cuban-Americans and freedom-loving Americans very proud. 

Linares dispels the lies propagated by most media outlets whose main interest is propaganda. When it comes to the restoration of freedom and democracy to Communist Cuba, the majority of the Cuban-American community is of one-mind. This is self-evident not only in the election of Cuban-American congressmen who embrace a hardline on Cuban matters, but in the many Cuban-American households who teach their children that there is price to be paid for democracy. 

Linares succeeded ten-term Democratic State Senator Eileen Daily for the 33rd Senate District, and, thus, became the first Republican to hold this seat since 1992.  At age 26, he is one of the youngest state senators in Connecticut history. He co-founded a commercial solar energy company, Greenskies, while majoring in entrepreneurship at the University of Tampa. Middletown-based Greenskies recently scored a $30 million contract to install solar panels at 27 Wal-Mart stores in Massachusetts. 

To listen to State Senator Linares’ speech, click on