The Final Stages

One: Convince the have nots that the haves are evil.
Two: Decry the evils of foreigners.
Three: Manipulate an election.
Four: Nationalize all media sources.

And the fifth stage: Expropriations.

Looks like fidel castro’s dream has finally been realized. He has managed to export his revolution.

Hugo Chavez has gone by the book in beginning the end of Venezuela. Although I must confess that I have not followed the events in that country meticulously – I haven’t been able to stomach the destruction of another country by way of Cuba’s example – Venezuela is slowly sinking down the hell hole of communism.

Scott wrote about Venezuelan bloggers being harrassed and quite possibly encarcerated through recently enacted laws making dissent and criticism of the government and Chavez illegal.

Just yesterday I received this link from A. M. Mora y Leon of the American Thinker.

Chavez orders Venezuela land title revision.

Hugo Ch?vez, Venezuela’s president, on Monday ordered a nationwide revision of land titles in an attempt to regulate an expanding but thus far chaotic programme of land redistribution.

Since coming to power six years ago, Mr Ch?vez has promised to carry out an agrarian reform as part of his self-styled ?revolution?. Yet in spite of a surge of land invasions, an official plan is only now being developed.

Landowners are now required to give up a percentage of their land to the people. Agrarian reform. The same agrarian reform that castro implemented in the early sixties in Cuba that ended up being catastrophic for the country’s economy. This agrarian reform was Che’s brainchild. Which is perhaps why the expropriators in Venezuela are donning Che Guevara shirts.

Under orders from the pro-Ch?vez governor of the province of Cojedes, 200km west of Venezuela’s capital, Caracas, about 200 troops accompanied a commission tasked, in theory, with evaluating the estate’s productivity. Rafael Alem?n, head of the commission in the Cojedes province, said it would determine within 90 days which areas of the estate were genuinely productive.

?Landowners have nothing to fear if it’s their property and it’s productive,? said Mr Alem?n, sporting a T-shirt with an image of Che Guevara, Latin America’s revolutionary icon.

There is but one stage left to accomplish the ruination of Venezuela. The nationalization of all banks, and the usurping of all funds in said banks for the good of the people. For the good of the revolution. Che’s coup de grace.

If the master plan is followed, forty years from now, despite its rich reserves in oil and rich agriculture, Venezuela will be a nation with a deteriorated infrastructure and a population living almost in squallor. Venezuela is and will be another Cuba, failed revolution and all.

42 thoughts on “The Final Stages”

  1. And their poverty will be blamed on us rather than the tapeworm-that-pretends-it’s-their-government, because our fellow travelers will collude in propping up the regime and trying to make it look good elsewhere in the world.

  2. One must wonder, though, how long might it last without someone as charismatic as fidel at the helm. Either way, the Venezuelans have my sympathy.

  3. A little on the dramatic side, don’t you think? Government opponents have been using the threat of Cubanization since day one–Christ, I remember being in Venezuela three years ago and hearing women screaming bloody murder about how it was only a matter of time before Chavez exposed his Castroite roots. I’m still waiting.

    Chavez has not “nationalized all media sources.” Prominent human rights organization will argue that there are problems in Venezuela, but the freedom of the press to express itself is hardly one of them. As for land reform, it is a process that has occured in many other countries without disastrous socialist side-effects, and is proceeding slowly anyhow. It’s also interesting to note that the government is going to compensate land-owners whose land is taken by paying them market value for that land. Doesn’t sound too extreme anymore, does it? In the U.S. that’s called “eminent domain.”

    As for the laws sanctioning criticism of the president, well, those were already on the books. In fact, many Latin American countries have similar laws, yet bloggers don’t spend their time warning of impending communism in those, do they? The laws aren’t a very good idea, in my opinion, but they are hardly an invention of Chavez’s to lock up bloggers and citizens who privately opine against the government.

    A dose of reality would do wonders here, my friends.

  4. A little on the dramatic side, don’t you think? Government opponents have been using the threat of Cubanization since day one–Christ, I remember being in Venezuela three years ago and hearing women screaming bloody murder about how it was only a matter of time before Chavez exposed his Castroite roots. I’m still waiting.

    Ayyyy, Martin,

    Please dont try to Jimmuh Carter the situation in Venezuela. We are truly witnessing the communization of a country. Every single action Chavez has taken has been straight from fidel castro’s Commie for Dummies guidelines.

    Youre doing yourself a diservice by blinding yourslef to the reality of Chavez’s castroite roots. It’s pretty apparent to me and anyone else without a self-imposed myopia.

    Chavez has not “nationalized all media sources.” Prominent human rights organization will argue that there are problems in Venezuela, but the freedom of the press to express itself is hardly one of them.

    Freedom of the press is in absolute grave danger in Venezuela now. Chavez knows, as he learned from his bearded mentor, that without full control of the media, he cannot keep his people deaf and dumb. You can sugar coat it all you like, but it’s already begun and will continue until no media can release any article, editorial or story without the expressed consent of the dictator in charge.

    As for land reform, it is a process that has occured in many other countries without disastrous socialist side-effects, and is proceeding slowly anyhow. It’s also interesting to note that the government is going to compensate land-owners whose land is taken by paying them market value for that land. Doesn’t sound too extreme anymore, does it? In the U.S. that’s called “eminent domain.”

    Funny how despite the fact that the government is paying the landowners “fair market” value (heh!) they still need armed goons and military to go about the process.

    As for the laws sanctioning criticism of the president, well, those were already on the books. In fact, many Latin American countries have similar laws, yet bloggers don’t spend their time warning of impending communism in those, do they? The laws aren’t a very good idea, in my opinion, but they are hardly an invention of Chavez’s to lock up bloggers and citizens who privately opine against the government.

    It is beside the point if other Latin American countries have such laws agaisnt criticizing the government. We are talking about Cuba, where the repercussions for the smallest of criticisms are dire, and Venezuela, where the repercussion for the smallest of criticisms will soon be dire. learn from the obvious and from history, Martin. Venezuela is experiencing a 21st century Cuban revolution.

    A dose of reality would do wonders here, my friends.

    Tell that to those that have already been beaten or killed or encarcerated in Venezuela. Or thiose whose businesses have been taken from them, or whose lands have been parceled and given away. Ask them about their reality.

    The only one here with an alternate reality is you, Martin. the rest of us are astute enough to see the real picture and understand it for what it is.

  5. Ah, what a shame. Venezuela, with all of its resources, is soon to go the way of Cuba and Zimbabwe. “Land reform” always works so well.

    I sincerely hope that we provide no food aid until Chavez is overthrown.

  6. Like I said earlier, Val, the threat of impending cubanization is thrown around all too often, much too freely, and with much to little regard for the truth. It’s one thing to say you are concerned about the state of a country, it’s quite another altogether to equate those concerns with the establishment of a totalitarian dictatorship. I visit Venezuela regularly enough to know that the opposition has used the same argument for years, though interestingly enough, few of them have ever travelled to Cuba to make that comparison. Trust me on this one–Venezuela is nowhere near Cuba, nor is it going in that direction.

    As for those beaten, killed, and encarcerated, well, its quite the news to me that Venezuela prior to Chavez was a human rights paradise (the events of the caracazo of 1989 seem to prove otherwise, no?). I don’t claim Venezuela enjoys a wondeful human rights record, but is it as bad as opponents would like to make it seem? No.

    Experience has it that Chavez’s opponents have spent the last few years becoming increasingly dramatic about the situation of their country. I take issue with your comments because they tend towards dramatic flare more than towards reality.

  7. Val, Martin works for the Venezuelan embassy in Washington DC. He’s not talking to you with honorable intentions. He’s a committed Chavista trying to dialogue with you on orders from the communist machinery there. They’re getting real aggressive these days.

  8. They’ve got a massive mudslide of a PR problem in their hands these days and the word is: counterattack. That’s why you’re seeing him here.

  9. You guys are bright ones. This “communist machinery” is so advanced that they send low-level functionaries like myself to scour the internet and post responses on blogs whose readerships numbers, at best, in the tens of people.

    It’s impressive–anything slightly left of center suddenly qualifies as “communist” these days. Sounds like the Cold War all over again.

  10. Martin: Chavez says he’s not a communist either. We’ll watch what he does, not what he says. He’s expropriating working farms right now using functionaries wearing Che Guevara tee shirts and has just passed a law making it a crime to ‘insult’ him, even in private. Go ahead and delude yourself that that’s not a communist dictatorship. I doubt you’d recognize anything as a communist dictatorship, really, until it’s overthrown. Anything else is just ‘social justice’ ain’t that right? It’s not principle for you, it’s who’s got the power.

  11. 1) I suppose I know what I am up against when the sponsor of this blog takes to calling me a “chiva.” Ahh, the wonders of reasoned debate.

    2) Yes, Chavez is pushing land reform that includes the expropriation of certain lands. Land reform, including expropriation of unused land, is hardly a new occurence. It has even happened in the past in Venezuela. What is important is that the lands taken by the state are shown to be unused and that compensation is given based on the market value of the land. The process seems to be going along slowly enough to make me believe that they are trying to abide by those two principles. This is hardly a communist tactic–like I mentioned in an earlier post, this power is similarly granted to the U.S. government (it’s called eminent domain). As for the government functionary wearing a Che t-shirt, well that was simply in bad taste. If he had walked on to the private lands waving a copy of the Communist Manifesto, I would agree that there is room to concerned.

    3) As for the law sanctioning insults of the president, well, Chavez did not pass that law. It was already on the books. Laws such as those exist in many Latin American countries, and few of those are pointed to as potential communist dictatorships.

    I’m not deluded that this is not a communist dictatorship. I have visited a communist dictatorship in the hemisphere, and Venezuela looks nor feels anything like it. You seem rather intent on seeing this “communist dictatorship” overthrown. What were your feelings on the one attempt to do so, an attempt which resulted in the implementation of a true dictatorship (though it only lasted a day)?

  12. Martin,

    Its impossible to have a reasoned debate with you because you deny the absolutey obvious. Venezuela is well on its way to becoming a communist country, despite your arguments – however inane or feeble – to the contrary.

    Recognizing you have a problem is the first step in curing that Trotskyite desease of yours. get passed that denial stage already.

  13. So in order to have a reasoned debate, I need to abandon reason and blindly accept your belief that Venezuela is going communist? Well, if that doesn’t scream irony, I don’t know what does!

    To be frank, your side hasn’t done much of a job at all of proving that Chavez is going communist. Apart from stating that land is being expropriated (a process that has and does occur in democratic countries) and that the media has been nationalized (an outright lie), you argument for a communist Venezuela is on weak ground. That seems to be the problem with the argument–all you have to do is attach the term to a country or a leader, and anyone who chooses to question that designation must be a communist in denial. So much for reason.

  14. Yes, Martin, whatever you say. I am the dictator here and what I say goes. But, at least, im no hypocrite, eh?

    Let me be fair and warn you, in advance, that a lesson for you on Moral Relativism is just one comment away.

    Im hungover today and I dont really feel like taking the time to do it, but I will if I have to.

    And it will be ugly. Real ugly.

  15. Val, I would love to hear your take on Moral Relativism.

    I am curious, though, are you one of those moral purists that screamed for democracy in Venezuela yet conviniently failed to criticize the dictatorship of Pedro Carmona when it was implemented by decree?

  16. Martin, what’s going on, has Bernie ordered you to come and ‘debunk’ the arguments?

    Tell us Martin, who is the biggest landowner of Venezuela?

    How about the resolution in Dec. 1999 of the Constituent Assembly to dissolve all constituted powers and elected representatives by Hugo Chavez and his thugs?

    You want me to continue? I can go on ridiculing your arguments you know?

    BTW, have you seen Silvino Bustillos?

    Send my love to Bernardo Alvarez Herrera.

  17. Val, I say we just keep that element of my opinion a mystery. I’m waiting for this particularly ugly take on moral relativism.

  18. Martin,

    Your political preference is vital to this conversation. Are you a Chavez supporter, yes or no?

    Its a simple question, and one that anyone reading this here thread knows the answer to. I just want you to state it on the record.

    Si, o no?

  19. Val, I choose not to answer the question because I have distinct opinions on the president and the movement which he represents. If you can’t offer your opinion on moral relatavism, then just say so.

  20. Your being pro or anti Chavez is essential to my argument.

    Come on, dude, this aint Penn State and I aint a big bad police officer. Be a man and answer the freaken question.

  21. Phew! An e-stalker! I’m flattered.

    For the sake of your argument, I will say I am pro-chavismo. Let’s not forget that the movement is not the same as the man, so my opinion on the president will remain my business. Good enough for you?

  22. My e-lips are sealed until I hear an argument on moral relativism. I was promised an ugly argument, I want an ugly argument! Man, you guys really know how to dodge debates!

  23. E-stalker?

    Hmmm, quite the contrary, really. Im not over at your blog boring everyone with my personal take on life’s mysteries. Its the other way around.

    And yes, now that you have stated that you are pro-chavismo, enlighten us on what exactly is chavismo?

  24. Well, as much fun as this is, Val, you really know how to back out of a promise. All I wanted to hear was an argument on moral relatavism, something you so seem to want to express. Just tell me what you think on the topic!

  25. PS: I don’t claim my blog is interesting. And as for boring, your most recent post is on you having a hard night of drinking! National news it isn’t, much less anything remotely of interest.

  26. Martin, is it at the Venezuelan taxpayer expense that you are wasting your precious time in this blog?

    Cmon mate, you use to work for HRW, tell us, what do you think about Bustillos’ case? How about Francisco Uson?

  27. Let me explain something Prince Martin. I am not here for your pleasure or for your edification. I write what I want to write when I want to write it.

    Want to hear my take on Moral relativism? then youll just have to wait for it. Ill write it if and when I damn well please. I assure you, it will come. On my terms, not yours.Si no te gusta, dont let the door hit your ass on the way out.

    You got quite some nerve man, Ill say that.

  28. Martin,

    Since my blog is so lacking in anything even remotely of interest, I am taking the liberty of banning you from my comments. After all, why would you want to be reading such boring, uninteresting stuff. I mean, youre an intellectual! A member of the intelligentsia! Far beit for me to make you wallow with us uneducated masses.

    I hope thats ok with you, asswipe.

  29. Re my question about Silvino Bustillos, just want to say that the man has allegedly file for asylum in Colombia.

  30. Val, thanks for showing Martin the door. We have to put up with shills like him all the time. Money talks and bullshit walks…

  31. Ed,

    I dont really like to ban people, but the “uninteresting” comment about my blog kinda stuck in my craw. And he kept asking for the argument on moral relativism unknowingly making that argument for me all along.

    What a putz. Too easy, man. Too easy.

  32. Martin says: “Yes, Chavez is pushing land reform that includes the expropriation of certain lands.”

    Which leads me to some questions: Why should land reform include expropriation of private lands when the state is by far the largest landowner in the country? 8 million hectares, with many farms over 100,000 hectares? Why not redistribute those? Also, did you know that Venezuela is 90% urban? How much land needs to be redistributed to the 10% of rural population in the country? Also, why did they choose Hato Pi?ero (basically, an ecological reserve) and El Charcote (a cattle ranch in the hands of the Brits since 1830)? Why have they not touched those lands in the hands of Mr Chavez, the governor of Barinas? It could be because he is the father of Hugo Rafael? Why, if the land reform is so important does not the governmemt give real ownership titles to the peasanst and only “ocuppation” rights? It may be because the government does not beeive in private property?

  33. Martin is a classic example of “Pendejos sin fronteras.” You did the right thing in banning him. Whether he’s Venezuelan or not, he’s merely another apologist helping to market the murderous Chavez regime.

    He’s the type of Chavista who’ll spend hours discussing how rational and objective his argument is and yet have nothing whatsoever to say about the growing list of obvious crimes being committed by the Chavez regime (such as inviting Colombian guerrilla commander Rodrigo Granda to a conference in Caracas).

    Chavistas will jail, torture or kill you and then explain how they did it for the sake of the poor. Gangsters with a seemingly infinite amount of oil money at their command.

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