I hope you are all STILL sitting down….

After seeing Val’s endorsement of Carl McGill I decided to visit Mr. McGill’s website, where I found an email, and well sent him a note asking him for further detail on his stand on Cuba and Fidel Castro.

I hope you are all still sitting down (grab your bells and whistles) because here is his response, undedited:

Good Day Sirs and Madams,

I am very concern about a dictator so close to our borders. And I’m concerned for four reasons. These reasons refer to human rights and homeland security.

First, I am of black American and Caribbean descent. In both the US and the island countries, the essence of my existence was the violation of human rights, and that refers to slavery and colonialism. In the dark periods of this hemisphere’s historical past existed conditions that many Cubans go through everyday, and that’s life under a dictator. So, think God America and its most of its Caribbean sisters have evolved in human rights.

Second, as we celebrate Black History Month, the Congressional Black Caucus represents the opposite of what black Americans should symbolize, and that’s freedom. Maxine Waters and the CBC support Fidel Castro. As politicians, they should wonder why there is little to no representation of Cuba’s current population in government. Demographically, current Cuba is mostly people of color. Is that reflected in the government? No! But go to Castro?s jails and one could easily see differently.

Third, on their VIP trips to Cuba, why don’t Waters and others question human rights violations unless they support it? I think it’s because they represent their districts similar to how Castro runs Cuba. Socialism does not work. Only free societies prosper. So as a member of the US Congress, I would vote to enforce the embargo on Castro until Cuba changes it governmental leadership. We don’t need an island prison existing in a democratic hemisphere. And representatives of a free that represent free people should not use their elected office to support Cuba’s dictator. And I think black Americans, once educated truthfully about Castro’s island prison, would be appalled at the black caucus’ friendship with Castro. Didn’t we free Cuba from Spain because of how the Cubans were mistreated? Therefore, I believe American needs to free Cuba from Fidel Castro, and I would stand with the Honorable Lincoln Diaz-Balart and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen in the US Congress on this issue.

Finally, as Al Qaeda is America’s enemy in the war on terrorism, so is Castro. We haven’t determined if Castro has Al Qaeda ties. So he is not exonerated from the possibility of launching the next 911. Therefore, we must remember the “Missiles of October,” for Al Qaeda has replaced the Russians as are enemy in the fight for freedom, and the friend of our enemy is our enemy.

Sincerely,

Carl McGill
Candidate for Congress 2006

Mr. Carl McGill certainly has my endorsement!

42 thoughts on “I hope you are all STILL sitting down….”

  1. He has mine too. Question is, how can we help?
    Most of us don’t live in his district?

    Very refreshing stance by Mr. Mcgill.
    He is one that doesn’t follow the herd mentality of many blacks in following the Democratic party’s left and worse.

    The Democratic party really hasn’t helped them at all.

  2. I think that it is great that he is taking a stand againt Castro and the human rights abuses in Cuba. But in reading, and re-reading his letter, I got the impression that he is only thinking about the representation of the blacks of his district. I hope that is not the case. But, if I were a member of his district, I’d break party ranks and vote for him!

  3. I actually don’t think he is thinking about the representation of the Blacks of his district but he is speaking from a Black person’s point of view. Demographically, his district is primarily Hispanic (I will assume primarily Mexican decent?) thus going after the Maxine Waters core constituency of Black voters would be political suicide.

    I myself (and I am Black) would try to win be any means necessary and work on educating the Black voting public about what is really happening in Cuba from the platform of a standing US Representative. My $0.02?.. – DWR

  4. I agree with Dave. I think this is a “new face” he is trying to put on “black” politics that will appeal to the rapidly growing black middle-class. This middle-class rejects, in whole or in part, the racist/socialist policies of Maxine Waters and her ilk. Am I correct on this Dave or am I missing something?

  5. George, if you keep falling, well, how should I put this, you’re not going to have much of an ass left to sit down!

    I think this guy looks to re-educate blacks once he is elected. My THUD moment came when he discusses the Black Caucus and the lack of blacks in Cuba’s “government”

    The only way I see we can help, is to campaign for this guy in our blogs, and to anyone we know from California. If his district is primarily Hispanic are these voting Hispanics?

  6. George ? I could not have stated it more eloquently. While necessary in the 60?s / 70?s, many Blacks of all classes are weary of what we see as a ?Civil Rights Industry?. We definitely are not naive enough to think that everything is ?dreamy / wonderful? in the US for Black Folks, but (my personal opinion) once it is exposed that the CBC / Maxim Waters are supporting a regime that oppresses people in Cuba WHO LOOK LIKE US there will be some degree of outrage in the Black community! Related, I took an informal survey of my friends as to whether they had heard of Dr. Oscar Elias Biscet and of course nobody had heard of him nor his plight. That is shameful?..

  7. Well the CANF supported him in 2000, I hope they do it again. His website now includes this letter, under Cuba.

  8. This is what happens when the commies control state government. I don’t think it’s changed much in the interim. I’d love it if someone could tell me otherwise.

    From 02

    To my utter disgust, the Marxists in Sacramento drew a redistricting plan that vastly expanded the old 35th from its central City of L.A. roots to other communities to the west, southwest, south, and southeast of the city. The point was to protect Maxine from the growth of Hispanic voters in the old boundaries of the 35th. As Hispanics have moved into the central part of the city, blacks have moved further into cities like Culver City, Inglewood, Hawthorne, Lawndald, Gardena, etc. The new district protects Maxine from a serious Hispanic challenger for awhile. Unfortunately, they came so far south with the new district in order to avoid the legal challenges that would come by making it a 100% Dem district, that I now live on the southern-most edge of the 35th, instead of the 36th. The newly reconfigured 35th is absolutely hopless for anyone other than hard Leftists, and likely will be for at least a generation, if not longer.

  9. According to the Census Bureau, Maxine’s district is 48% Hispanic (mostly Mexican), 32% African-American, and 11% White. And, yet, Maxine wins 80% of the vote pretty much every election (she was first elected to Congress in 1990 and has held her seat without interruption). I guess I am left with the same question La Ventanita asked about whether most of these Hispanics are non-voting. Anybody know?

  10. The district is 67.14 Democrat, 13.94% Republican, the rest is split between Independents, Peace & Freedom, Greens, Libertarians , and others. The majority of “Hispanic” voters in Los Angles Co. vote Democrat.

  11. Hmmmm? I Told you so!
    I remember telling folks that my party loyalty was tied to Cuba. Looks like the GOP better wake up.
    There is nothing wrong in voting for the best candidate. No matter what party! I am still a Republican, but open to like minded democrats.

  12. Just wanted to add that the majority of all voters out here on the left coast vote democrat. When it comes to Mexican Americans, whose values are more in sync with the Republican Party, Prop. 187 and the accompanying rhetoric drove them away for a long time to come.

  13. To echo a Beach Boys song: “Wouldn’t it be nice…” if we could get the best, most sensible, rational, and smartest from all our political parties and get a new party going, a real counterweight to the present situation. Because, given the “stats” the Democratic party at present you may as well write off, and “our” GOP, except for some notable exceptions, seems to be on a reality-defying course, and mostly just paying lip service to the Cuba issue.

    One thing we can do to help Mr. McGill is spread word of his campaign, his philosopy, all over. This is one area where webmasters and bloggers can give the MSM a run for the money.

    As for people like Waters: I think her behavior and attitude is a reflection a deep self-hatred and feeling of worthlessness – mirrored in her fawning, irrational admiration for a dictator who is nothing more than a plantation overseer in the modern equivalent of an antebellum slave camp. If her constituency can be educated to understand this, it will be the end of her political career.
    Don’t write Mr. McGill off yet…

  14. I’m having a hard time understanding how a group of white Cubans can so easily sit down at their keyboards to find parallels between the realities of race in Cuba and the perceptions of race in the United States.

    What qualifications are necessary for this?

    Does one have to spend his Saturdays running around an empty field dressed in woolen gray costumes “firing” muskets to be able to comment on what makes a plantation overseer? Is this where Hillary Clinton went wrong last month?

    Is this why we don’t ever see any Black Cubans trying to come to this country? Because they don’t know how much better they have it in the US than in Cuba?

    Could they be that clueless?

  15. Pablo,
    You don’t need to believe us. Believe Dr. Biscet in a letter from to the late Coretta King:
    Havana. January 20, 1999.

    Mrs. Coretta Scott King

    Dear Madame:

    Your presence still reflects a loving devotion to your spouse and the just
    cause he defended. You were his strength and support in the most difficult
    moments of the civil rights movement of which your husband was a leader. You
    are an example and a light that guides our path.

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, an American as well as a universal hero, made a
    reality a Constitution of laws which, when applied, shined even more as they
    benefited the human race for the honor and glory of God. The speech
    pronounced by the Reverend King at the Lincoln Memorial ” I Have a Dream “,
    is today a reality. Immigrants such as Sammy Sosa and Duque Hernandez are
    live examples of the American dream.

    Cuba, a totalitarian society ruled by communism, rejected non-violent methods
    of struggle, inciting the black community to obtain power through the use of
    violence as they themselves had done in the past. As activists of the Lawton
    Foundation for Human Rights, we dream that respect for life and liberty exist
    in our country as we are opposed to the death penalty, abortion, and the
    current arbitrary laws of the Cuban Penal Code which violate the universal
    rights of man. We wish these benefits to be enjoyed by the whole world for we
    do not defend a particular race but, the entire human race because we are
    children of the living God. It is He who made us, and not we ourselves (Psalm
    100:3 ), God, who shows no partiality…(Deuteronomy 10:17-18.)

    In our country, discrimination exists against the black race which, together
    with the mestizo, represent around 70% of the population. They have a very
    low political, economic, and judicial representation in contrast to the
    numerous prevailing black penal population. This situation is never publicly
    manifested by the government but is a component of communism’s subtle
    politics of segregation. The following are examples of economic, political,
    and social segregation that exist:

    – Inhabitants of the eastern section of the Island, most of whom are
    black, were expelled from Havana and a current decree prohibits their freedom
    of movement to and from the capital city.
    – Foreigners invest in Cuba, enjoy the best hotels, beaches, and medical
    assistance while Cubans cannot.
    – The mass media manifests an open-anti-Semitism. The government is
    openly partial towards the Arabs while it promotes contempt for the
    Israelites.
    – Religious schools are not permitted, forcing parents to send their
    children to public schools where scientific atheism is taught (communism).
    Those in the military cannot profess any religious belief.
    – Children have no toys. These are sold in dollars in the government
    stores while only 20% of the population has access to this foreign currency.
    – Government dissent means the loss of your job, discontinuation of
    middle and higher education, jail, and exile.

    Thanks to our exile community, the Cuban people have not suffered ostracism,
    or have been usurped and erased from the face of the earth by communism as is
    the case of Tibet. The free and democratic world is apathetic towards our
    people, ignoring their right to independence. Dr. King said: ” If at present
    I lived in a communist country I would also promote justice.”

    We derive our inspiration from the Reverend Martin Luther King, Mrs. Rosa
    Parks, and the city of Montgomery. We hope that your example makes a
    difference in the hearts of the religious community in Cuba. It is not enough
    to praise the living God while there are voices who turn their backs to the
    suffering of the oppressed. On the 70th anniversary of the birth of Martin
    Luther King, we wanted to honor his memory only to be repressed and
    arbitrarily detained by the government. The despotism manifested by the
    authorities was such that a photograph of Martin Luther King was violently
    grabbed from a civil activist. Our wish is that you send us a photograph of
    your husband autographed by yourself.

    Today, the Cuban people live in darkness and the human rights activists are
    caught inside a tornado called communism. But, we begin to see the awakening
    of a dawn when a radiant sun will soon shine. ” Who among you fear the Lord?
    Who obeys the voice of His Servant? Who walks in darkness and sees no light?
    Let him trust in the name of the Lord and rely upon his God.” (Isaiah 51:5 )
    Reverend Martin Luther King, your voice has been heard in Cuba. May he be
    with God forever.

    Lawton Foundation for Human Rights
    Dr. Oscar El?as Biscet
    Rolando M. Yyobre

    No don’t you find it harder to believe that there are NO blacks in the Castro hierarchy?

    How does it feel to have your idiotic argument shot down?

  16. Max

    Did anyone ever tell Dr. Biscet that Blacks in this country are incarcerated at a rate egregiously higher than their actual total population ratio?

    I am sure that Dr. Biscet was also aware of Dr. King’s reason for being in Memphis the day he was gunned down: showing solidarity for striking sanitation workers.

    I hope that Dr. Biscet read Dr. King’s “letter from the Birmingham jail.”

    I am confident that Dr. Biscet has thought about how Fidel Castro was in power for over 9 years when Dr. King was killed in Memphis and no statements criticizing or even questioning Castro were made – in written or oral form – by King. Dr. Biscet has likely realized that Dr. King did not see the need to condemn Castro in Cuba when there was so much to condemn in his own country.

    Indeed, Martin Luther King, Jr. knew that the work of fixing the United States was too daunting to allow for energies to be diverted towards another nation’s domestic issues. To be fair, Dr. King was a great humanitarian who loved all of God’s children – including his enemies – as Jesus taught him to do but there was too much work for him at home.

    I think it is a lesson that Carl McGill should learn.

    After all, the issues of racism, elitism, poverty, and hypocrisy are alive and well in Gardena and Inglewood – why are you going to Cuba to fix what is broken in your own backyard?

  17. Pablo,

    Please provide SOURCES (reputable ones please.)

    I have shown you evidence from a BLACK man IN CUBA that totally makes your argument bogus

    Comparing inmates in Cuba like Dr. Biscet to the murderers, rapists and thieves here (OF ANY COLOR) is ridiculous, so don’t even try it.

    Since you have sidestepped all the facts that back up my argument and shoot down yours, lets add one more..

    Why are all the rafts headed to the United States FROM Cuba? If there is so much injustice here why aren’t you living in Cuba?

    Again, why aren’t blacks in positions of leadership in Cuba? Why arent there any Condoleeza Rices or Colin Powells in Fidel’s circle?

    Why aren’t there any Oprah Winfreys in Cuba?

    I could go on and on but I won’t waste my time on you.

    I wouldn’t mind debating you if you were genuine, but when your REAL agenda is dissemenating falsehoods and propaganda and slandering the United States and us, you would be better suited looking for a blog on http://www.granma.cu, if you can find one.

  18. Pablo, I fail to see your point. Can you be a bit clearer? I’m honestly having a really hard time dissecting all your arguments to find out what your central thesis is.

    In response to your first comment:
    1. We are all not Cubans here, we have people from various countries in fact
    2. If you would’ve read Dave’s comments on this post you would’ve realized we are not all white either.

  19. Max

    All of my comments have been made in the spirit of an open exchage of ideas and experiences and all you seem to be doing is attacking and dismissing.

    It appears that I am not the one that is not interested in a mature, intelligent discussion.

    I never realized that the simple democratic act of honestly disagreeing with someone is justification for acts like yours.

    I admit that I do not know much about Dr. Biscet but I would like to learn more. Speaking of which, what sources have you offered thus far to back up your claims about Dr. Biscet and Blacks in Cuba? If you (or anyone else) has them I would sincerely like to see them. Honesty is the best teacher.

    I will continue my honesty by saying that the information I read on websites like afrocubaweb.com and read from Black Cuban people like Pedro Perez Sarduy and Alberto Jones has lead me to believe that African-Americans are not getting enough information about what is going on in Cuba. To whit, I received a copy of an article written about an African-American man returning to his native Louisiana after completing his medical studies in Cuba – at no cost to him.

    I will continue my honesty with you: I am interested in facts, not partisan rants slanted to fit a particular agenda.

    I would like to learn about dissidents in Cuba in the same manner that I hope that you would be open to learning about dissidents in this country.

    Speaking of which, do you really believe that the ONLY people locked up in this country are murderers and theives and NONE of the people in Cuban jails are murderers and theives?

    Do you really believe that innocent people in either country are not locked up unjustly?

    Right now, I don’t have access to facts corroborating my earlier statements about the disproportionate number of Black Americans in American jails but I can certainly produce them. My concern however is that I will go to that measure to get the facts and you will find something to dismiss the facts on. In other words, my fear is that no matter what I share, you will not accept it.

    As I stated before, I welcome an open honest mature exchange of information so I do want to learn more about Biscet and the dissidents in Cuba but in fairness I want to be able to discuss why people like Orlando Bosch and Luis Posada Carriles are given free rides.

    The background information for this website says that is for the purpose of having people learn more about the “Cuba thing.”

    I want to participate in that.

    Before I go any further, please let me know if that is a legit possibility here.

    Regards,

  20. Pablo, when was the last time you saw 75 journalists imprisoned for dissenting with the government in the US? Doing so would put for starters The New York times out of business.

    Second, I agree with Max that you can’t draw comparisons between jailed convicted criminals here in the US (any color) and political prisoners in Cuba.

    If you read afrocubaweb, you must’ve read about Biscet who is a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International, and you must’ve also read about the racism still existent in Cuba, where they are called the “n” word.

    Leads you to believe that African Americans are not getting enough information? They are getting almost none! What they get is leaders like Jesse Jackson praising and visiting Castro.

    I honestly fail to see a central argument in your posts. This is not about “innocent people jailed”. heck at least here they all got some kind of trial, and were accused of a crime.

    In Cuba, your neighbor accuses you of counterrevolutionary activities and you get a judge that in a summary trial declares you guilty and sentences you to jail.

    It would serve you to visit sites like CubaNet or NetforCuba, in which independent reporters risk their lives to report REAL news about Cuba.

  21. Pablo,

    First, Id like to tell you to take things you read at sites like afrocuba eweb and others sponsored by the Cuban government with a grain of salt.

    Second, no one here is trying to discredit you, personally, only your myopic argument.

    if you need more information on how black cubans live, you need go no further than the archives of this blog. there are plenty of news items on repression against black cubans here interspersed with repression against whites. It may be hard for you to understand this, of course, because you view things through a racial prism. fact of the matter is that on this blog, we dont care if they are white cubans or black cubans. We dont care if they are mullatto cubans or taino cubans. You are right in one assumption, in Cuba, there is very little racial inequality as compared to the US. thats because there is a universal inequality that applies to all cubans, regardless of skin color or ethnicity. In Cuba, all cubans are exactly the same: a second class citizen in their own country.

    it’s called apartheid. You are familiar with that term, no?

    Foreigners, such as that black American doctor that studied in Cuba, or the canadian businessman, or the german tourist, or the venezuelan visitor are the elite. With access to every western luxury imaginable, while the Cuban counterparts are treated not only as second hand citizens, but banned from many certain portions of their own country. they get ration cards and meager food supplies from the state, while the tourist dine on lobster that the cuban caught but aint allowed to eat.

    So please, do not come here to this blog and make Cuba’s problem a racial issue. let’s not export your problems with race to Cuba.

    If it is so good there for black cubans and there is a certain equality and you accept the lives they lead, then great. We agree. now lets move on to the issue of making all Cubans equal to the rest of the world, ok?

    Ill talk about racial issues in the US all you want. But comparing cuba’s racial customs to US ones is a red herring Id prefer we not have to waste any time on.

  22. Pablo,

    I want to believe you are honest. But when you make insinuations and wild suppositions based on what you read on radical web sites such as afrocubaweb, and on the other hand slander us as being only “white” people, what am I supposed to think?

    You have failed to answer my questions that really expose what you have stated as outright propaganda. What you came on here stating is right out of what could be Fidel’s “manifesto”.

    That is like going to black web site and espousing the virtues of the KKK, get it?

    It has been widely known and documented within independent circles the brutality of the Cuban regime. It has and still is racist because again, it is not represented equally.

    Let’s address some of your points,
    “All of my comments have been made in the spirit of an open exchage of ideas and experiences and all you seem to be doing is attacking and dismissing.

    Who started with the insinuation that we are whites not qualified to talk about blacks in Cuba?

    It appears that I am not the one that is not interested in a mature, intelligent discussion.”

    Yeah, so long as I accept your afrocubaweb inspired propaganda as factual, YOU might consider this “mature and intelligent”. What you need to do is read other sources, including this one, and listen to those that have lived through communism, LIKE US..

    “I never realized that the simple democratic act of honestly disagreeing with someone is justification for acts like yours.”

    Lets see, you are subliminally praising a regime like Cuba TOTALLY devoid of anything close to democratic rights and stating that the US is the one with the problem.

    “I admit that I do not know much about Dr. Biscet but I would like to learn more”

    Allow us to educate you. Read the letter I posted straight from his hand. That says it all.
    Its a good start. He has been in and out of prison only for speaking out in favor of human rights for all, not just blacks.

    “To whit, I received a copy of an article written about an African-American man returning to his native Louisiana after completing his medical studies in Cuba – at no cost to him.”

    Read about those in Cuba who are doctors and are forced to prostitute themselves just to make ends meet. Read about those Cuban doctors that are FORCED away from their families against their will only to serve as propaganda tools for Castro. By the way, there are mechanisms available to ANYONE here to achieve a medical degree in the US, such as grants and scholarships. It will also be a far superior education to what you can receive in Cuba.

    “I will continue my honesty with you: I am interested in facts, not partisan rants slanted to fit a particular agenda.”

    I don’t think you were being honest. You dont come in here slandering right off the bat and expect respect. Do unto others…

    “I would like to learn about dissidents in Cuba in the same manner that I hope that you would be open to learning about dissidents in this country.”

    Dissidents in this country? Since when has anyone been sent to a firing squad or imprisoned in this country for their beliefs? Afrocubaweb has really brainwashed you.
    Conversely, there are countless bullet-riddled walls in Cuba where people have been shot simply for their beliefs. There are thousands more imprisoned and dead in the Florida straights fleeing communism in Cuba. Bet you didn’t read that on Afrocubaweb.

    “Speaking of which, do you really believe that the ONLY people locked up in this country are murderers and theives and NONE of the people in Cuban jails are murderers and theives?”

    To the first part of the question, the vast majority are convicted by a jury ( which may include blacks) and a judge. This may not be perfect, but it is far better than the summary trials in Cuba. I challenge you to read about the 3 black men executed with a couple of days trying to flee the country under the pretense of hijacking a boat.
    While I am sure that some of the people in jail in Cuba deserve to be there, there is a large proportion in jail simly being denied basic rights. Many of those are black.

    “Right now, I don’t have access to facts corroborating my earlier statements about the disproportionate number of Black Americans in American jails but I can certainly produce them. My concern however is that I will go to that measure to get the facts and you will find something to dismiss the facts on. In other words, my fear is that no matter what I share, you will not accept it.”

    Try me… If you try to tell me that there exists human rights in Cuba, or the human rights situation here is not on par with Cuba, I will never agree, because there is overwhelming evidence to the contrary, proven over and over again. We have seen it first hand.

    “As I stated before, I welcome an open honest mature exchange of information so I do want to learn more about Biscet and the dissidents in Cuba but in fairness I want to be able to discuss why people like Orlando Bosch and Luis Posada Carriles are given free rides.”

    Posada Carriles was absolved of wrong doing in a Venezuelan courtroom. I don’t know much about Bosch. What I do know is that the atrocities committed by the regime you seem to seek to defend greatly dwarf anything these two men might have done. You must also take into account the context. Should we condemn the French freedom fighters during WW2 that may have taken innocent lives as a result of their struggle against tyranny?
    FACT: Between Stalin, Fidel, Chairman Mao, Pol Pot, and other communist thugs, they are responsible for over 100,000,000 deaths. Tens of thousands are Cuban, including those dead in the Florida straights and those killed in Angola sent by Fidel to kill other blacks.

    “The background information for this website says that is for the purpose of having people learn more about the “Cuba thing.”

    We are the “Cuban thing”. We have lived it, personally. We have seen the slaughter and brutality.

    “Before I go any further, please let me know if that is a legit possibility here.”

    That is entirely up to you. What I can assure you, is that if you continue to slander us, or trumpet what WE KNOW is propanda, you won’t last long here. We have suffered too long and too much to allow you or anyone else to parrot propanda we know to be untrue.

    Now that I have answered all your points ONE BY ONE. I expect you to answer mine.

    Lets start with this one, again.

    Why are all the rafts headed to the United States from Cuba, carrying people of ALL colors (contrary to what you said, and I can prove it)
    and not into Cuba?

    When you’re done with that one, go to the other questions I asked. Just use TRUTH as your guidelines.

    Regards

  23. It does not take the brains or training of genius to know why no rafts are heading towards Cuba anymore than why no mules are leading people across the desert into Mexico or why no one is trying to leave Spain for Morocco.

    Cuba is a poor country. What else can you can a country where the average income is a paltry 2,800??

    There is no denying that Cuba does not have the financial resources of the United States. I think it is important to note for the record that over half of the people on Earth have to live on less than two dollars a day and a significant portion of that group actually has less than a dollar per diem to take care of housing, clothing, medicine, food, education, etc.

    La Ventanita

    I am afraid that you are not seeing the central point of my agrument because I am not here to argue. I apologize if my inquisitive nature manifests into a form that individuals of diverse cognitive plateaus find hostile. It is not my intention.

    I like questions because it exercises the brain that God gave me.

    you can’t draw comparisons between jailed convicted criminals here in the US (any color) and political prisoners in Cuba.

    Why can’t I?

    I still have yet to see figures that sheds some light on just how many people are incarcerated in Cuba total and how many of those incarcerated are political prisoners. It is unfair to ask me to participate in a conversation based on a particular point of view much less accept that point of view without having some pertinent context upon which to base anything that would be worthwhile to any one of us.

    On December 31, 2004 —

    2,135,901 prisoners were held in Federal or State prisons or in local jails — an increase of 2.6% from yearend 2003, less than the average annual growth of 3.4% since yearend 1995.

    — there were an estimated 486 prison inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents — up from 411 at yearend 1995.

    — the number of women under the jurisdiction of State or Federal prison authorities increased 4.0% from yearend 2003, reaching 104,848 and the number of men rose 1.8%, totaling 1,391,781.

    At yearend 2004 there were 3,218 black male sentenced prison inmates per 100,000 black males in the United States, compared to 1,220 Hispanic male inmates per 100,000 Hispanic males and 463 white male inmates per 100,000 white males. http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/prisons.htm

    If you read afrocubaweb, you must’ve read about Biscet who is a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International, and you must’ve also read about the racism still existent in Cuba, where they are called the “n” word.

    I don’t visit afrocubaweb.com that often but based on your statements I will be sure to delve deeper to find the facts you cited about Dr. Biscet, AI, and the “n” word.

    Quick question: when you refer to the “n” word, are you referring to the word “negrito” that I have heard white Cubans use in Miami when referring to a grown man or “chardo” which is another word in Miami?

    That begs the next question: why the collective hostility between Black Miami and Cuban Miami?

    I know that not all of you are from Miami or live in Miami (I’ve been reading entries here) so I don’t expect all of you to be able to answer that question. I also know that not all of you actually lived in Cuba and a fair amount have not visited Cuba so I don’t want everyone here to feel obliged to answer questions for which he or she does not have an answer based on a more disciplined empirical standard. Ditto for those who post here that are not Cuban. I’m not trying to burden anyone.

    at least here they all got some kind of trial, and were accused of a crime.

    “Some kind of trial” is not provided for in the Bill of Rights. Certain stringent provisions were put in as protections against the dangers of legal vagueness (that’s how vigilantes operate).

    Oh, before I forget: re. the harsh standards by which Black Americans are subjected to in this country’s justice system I ask readers to look up McClesky v. Kemp (1987) before anyone else tries to point out the ills of Cuba’s judicial system by highlighting the benefits of ours. Our country’s legal system is criminally flawed so let’s just focus on how bad Cuba’s is and leave it at that.

    Val,

    You contradicted yourself with this statement,

    no one here is trying to discredit you, personally, only your myopic argument.

    by saying that “no one” was attempting to invalidate my opinions and, in the same sentence, describing said opinions as “myopic.”

    Was that intentional?

    Id like to tell you to take things you read at sites like afrocuba eweb and others sponsored by the Cuban government with a grain of salt.

    Are you sure that afrocubaweb.com is “sponsored by the Cuban government”? I see that they are based in La Ventanita’s neck of the maple woods. If afrocubaweb.com WAS “sponsored by the Cuban government” wouldn’t our government take some appropriate measures like shutting them down?

    Are you sure that they are “sponsored by the Cuban government”?

    Concerning that grain of salt, does that mean that I should take La Ventanita’s comments with a grain of salt as well? She told me to refer to afrocubaweb.com for information about Dr. Biscet, Amnesty International, and the “n” word. Because both she and afrocubaweb.com are in New England do I need extra grains?

    if you need more information on how black cubans live, you need go no further than the archives of this blog.

    Are there Black Cubans posting on this website?

    Please pardon me but listening to white Cubans talk about life for Black Cubans before or after 1959 makes about as much sense to me as listening to white people from Mississippi talk about life for Blacks from the Sipp before or after 1959. No offense but why would I want to talk to 76ers fan about the Celtics?

    It may be hard for you to understand this, of course, because you view things through a racial prism. fact of the matter is that on this blog, we dont care if they are white cubans or black cubans.

    It’s not hard for me Val … well not anymore difficult for me than it is for you as a Cuban.

    I have not visited every inch of this website so I missed the following please pardon me: have you guys talked about El Doce? If you have, please provide me with a link. I have a tough time getting the Cubans I know in this country to talk about it much less even acknowledge it.

    As for apartheid, of course I am familiar with it just like I am familiar with Nelson Mandela. I remember when H. T. Smith and others led a boycott of Miami’s tourism industry because of how Miami’s local leaders snubbed Mandela during his tour of the United States after his release from prison. It is important to note that the only community in the United States that displayed such rudeness and hostility towards a man that spent most of his life imprisoned for his political beliefs.

    I still find it hard to belief that petty city and county officials could do that to a living symbol of indomitable resistance to oppression all because he thanked the Cubans for being the only country in the world willing to take on the Republic of South Africa in open combat thereby hastening the demise of the apartheid system.

    *The only Angolans killed by Cubans (and other Angolans) were those in league with the South African army invading Angola during that country’s long civil war.

    It is important to acknowledge that for the same reason it is important to acknowledge our country’s role in freeing France from the Nazis.

    Foreigners, such as that black American doctor that studied in Cuba, or the canadian businessman, or the german tourist, or the venezuelan visitor are the elite. With access to every western luxury imaginable,

    How do you know this? Are you familiar with this young man and his story? Do you even know his name? How can someone make such a blanket statement like that without having any of the facts?

    Do you want me to post a link to the newspaper article that came out profiling this man and his experiences in Cuba and since his return? I have the url link ready if you like. That is unless, of course, I jumped to the wrong conclusion and you do know about this man and his experiences.

    now lets move on to the issue of making all Cubans equal to the rest of the world

    Considering how most of the world lives on two bucks or less a day, the $7.50 or so a day the average Cuban makes (which includes free education, free healthcare, subsidized housing) would be making “all Cubans” take a pretty big step back?

    Is the personal vendetta Miami’s exile Cuba have against Fidel Castro that petty that they would want Cuba to become poorer for the sake of making Cuba “equal” with its global neighbors?

    like going to black web site and espousing the virtues of the KKK, get it?

    Do you “get it”? What do YOU know about the Klu Klux Klan?

    It has been widely known and documented within independent circles the brutality of the Cuban regime.

    Could you please list these “independent circles” for me?

    we are whites not qualified to talk about blacks in Cuba?

    Are you?

    If you are, what makes you more qualified than Pedro Perez Sarduy?

    so long as I accept your afrocubaweb inspired propaganda as factual, YOU might consider this “mature and intelligent”. What you need to do is read other sources, including this one, and listen to those that have lived through communism, LIKE US..

    Another jab at La Ventanita? I don’t think that is fair to attack her just because she recommended getting facts about Dr. Biscet, Amnesty International and “negritos” from a website that is probably less than a 90 minute drive from where she lives.

    I am curious about your statement about living under communism. How long did you live under communism? I know that Val left in the first decade of the revolution when he was a young boy. When did you leave Cuba? How old were you? How many babalubloggers lived under communism? I know that La Ventanita did not nor did ziva (living in California does not count). Wait, I’m sorry. I forgot. Is ziva Cuban? Sorry – I digress.

    you are subliminally praising a regime like Cuba TOTALLY devoid of anything close to democratic rights and stating that the US is the one with the problem.

    How can you tell if anyone is doing anything subliminally? I didn’t know you were pyschic. That’s wonderful. As for the United States and its problems with democracy and Cuba and ITS problems with democracy I see nothing wrong with discussing how both countries have work to do. It is possible that BOTH nations have issues. Dealing in absolutes is not healthy. Cuba has problems. No kidding. The United States does, too. What’s the problem? I can point out ten things wrong with the Pittsburgh Steelers but those ten things do not take away from the fact that they are the best football team in the NFL.

    Stop being so sensitive. You’re too old for that.

    Max, I was hoping (still am in fact) for more information about Dr. Biscet than one letter. I appreciate the information presented thus far about the Lawton project but I still want to know more about its platform, its mission, other notable officers, specific charges levied against by the Cuban government, what people in the world community are saying about Lawton and so on.

    The letter is a start (what did Mrs. King say in return?) but a great start does not mean much past that. Ask the University of Louisville football team.

    Dissidents in this country? Since when has anyone been sent to a firing squad or imprisoned in this country for their beliefs? Afrocubaweb has really brainwashed you.
    Conversely, there are countless bullet-riddled walls in Cuba where people have been shot simply for their beliefs. There are thousands more imprisoned and dead in the Florida straights fleeing communism in Cuba. Bet you didn’t read that on Afrocubaweb.

    Again with the jabs at La Ventanita. Jeez.

    As for dissidents locked up in this country, here are a few that I can think of right off:

    *Martin Luther King
    *Cornel West
    *Eugene Debs
    *Henry David Thoreau
    *Elijah Muhammad
    *Congressman John Lewis
    *Pedro Albizu Campos

    Muhammad Ali did not go to jail but, like a certain Phi Beta Kappa lawyer from Columbia Law School turned actor-singer, his livelihood was stripped away at the prime of his career for his principles.

    Does afrocubaweb.com or this blog have any information on the number of Central Americans turned to dust trying to cross the vast desert of the Southwestern United States trying to flee poverty like Cubans?

    *I’ve heard the soundbites, read the clippings where many, many balseros recovered at sea came because they grew weary of the lines and the rationing and wanted to live like their primos in Miami. I suppose that hunger can be politicized but if it can then those poor folks from Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco or Chiquimula, El Progreso, Escuintla, Huehuetenango, Izabal, Jalapa, Jutiapa, Peten, Quetzaltenango, Quiche are political refugees too and their feet were a lot drier than than the Cubans.

    Why can’t they get in?

    Posada Carriles was absolved of wrong doing in a Venezuelan courtroom. I don’t know much about Bosch. What I do know is that the atrocities committed by the regime you seem to seek to defend greatly dwarf anything these two men might have done. You must also take into account the context. Should we condemn the French freedom fighters during WW2 that may have taken innocent lives as a result of their struggle against tyranny?

    Posada was not absolved of anything. If he was why did certain “unnamed benefactors” in Miami have to bribe officials so Posada could escape from prison?

    Why don’t you know about Bosch?

    Weren’t you at any of those demonstrations where little old ladies were roused out of their little apartments into the streets by a passioned plea on La Cubanisima or a very young Radio Mambi to demand clemency from the US government?

    You didn’t know that Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and her campaign manager at the time, a business man named John Ellis “Jeb” Bush arranged to have the White House pardon him for not just the bombing of a civilian airliner in the mid-seventies but the laundry list of bombings and bazooka blasts from Miami to New York to Caracas to Mexico City and beyond?

    You didn’t know any of that?

    You never googled Orlando Bosch?

    You never asked someone over cafe at La Esquina de Tejas?

    You never asked Bosch himself? After all, thanks to the pardon, he has no need to hide and is living a charmed life in Miami painting quaint little vistas.

    Should we condemn the French freedom fighters during WW2 that may have taken innocent lives as a result of their struggle against tyranny?

    No, we should not unless they also decided to kill innocent civilians out of the frustration borne of not being able to put on a uniform and fight like men and women. I’m not aware of any instance in which a member of the French Resistance or the Resistance in Warsaw’s Ghetto intentionally killing in cold blood a group of unsuspecting and undeserving civilians.

    No, mass murder of civilians does not sound like the French or Polish resistance. It sounds more like Osama bin Laden. *Google the “Cuban bin Laden” and see what comes up.

    Just use TRUTH as your guidelines.

    Ditto brother, ditto.

  24. Pablo:

    You really need to get off the kool-aid.

    I will respond to your long winded, skewed, and hidden-agenda post when I have them time if I so choose.

    Let’s quickly address to really idiotic points.
    Comparing sports teams to the United States and Cuba or Human rights as an analogy is ridiculous.
    You base your statements on your radical OPINION rather than facts.

    You “conveniently” sweep under the rug all the well documented evidence of communism and especially Cuba’s barbarity to suit your agenda.

  25. Pablo,

    by saying that “no one” was attempting to invalidate my opinions and, in the same sentence, describing said opinions as “myopic.”

    Have a slight problem with reading comprehension? I believe I stated your argument was myopic, not your opinions. Or, are they one and the same?

    Are you sure that afrocubaweb.com is “sponsored by the Cuban government”? I see that they are based in La Ventanita’s neck of the maple woods. If afrocubaweb.com WAS “sponsored by the Cuban government” wouldn’t our government take some appropriate measures like shutting them down?

    If you do not see that afrocubaweb is a pro-castro website, then I dont know what to tell you.
    How can you think you will be taken seriously if you are dishonest with yourself?

    Are there Black Cubans posting on this website?

    Gee, I dont know. Ive never really asked what skin color the people that post here are. Should I ask them all just to appease you? Or will you turn around and use that as a basis for a racist smear?

    Please pardon me but listening to white Cubans talk about life for Black Cubans before or after 1959 makes about as much sense to me as listening to white people from Mississippi talk about life for Blacks from the Sipp before or after 1959. No offense but why would I want to talk to 76ers fan about the Celtics?

    Wasnt it you the one that brought up the black/white issue? This is my website and I dont treat black or white cubans or otherwise any differently.

    I have not visited every inch of this website so I missed the following please pardon me: have you guys talked about El Doce? If you have, please provide me with a link. I have a tough time getting the Cubans I know in this country to talk about it much less even acknowledge it.

    And you expect to be taken seriously when you yourself state that you have not visited every inch of the website. Trust me, a peripheral review will not do it. Go through the archives yourself before taking to condescension.

    As for apartheid, of course I am familiar with it just like I am familiar with Nelson Mandela. I remember when H. T. Smith and others led a boycott of Miami’s tourism industry because of how Miami’s local leaders snubbed Mandela during his tour of the United States after his release from prison. It is important to note that the only community in the United States that displayed such rudeness and hostility towards a man that spent most of his life imprisoned for his political beliefs.

    being that you are familiar with apartheid and nelson Mandela then you make my point exactly. How is apartheid bad in Africa and not in Cuba?

    How can you criticize the Cuban community for understanding the hypocrisy and making their voices heard? I was one of those with a “Free Nelson mandela” bumper sticker on my car. I was one of those who watched the historic gathering when he was freed. And if you think fidel castro helped mandela out of the goodness of his heart you are totally naive. Just take a good look at the make up of fidel’s government and tell me there are a proportionate number of blacks in the government per capita.

    How do you know this? Are you familiar with this young man and his story? Do you even know his name? How can someone make such a blanket statement like that without having any of the facts?

    Do you want me to post a link to the newspaper article that came out profiling this man and his experiences in Cuba and since his return? I have the url link ready if you like. That is unless, of course, I jumped to the wrong conclusion and you do know about this man and his experiences.

    I am familiar with this man’s story. But since you brought him up, the burden is on you to provide whatever data or link you need to support your assertion.

    Again, you sidestep the issue perfectly. The issue isnt about black or white. The issue is about Cubans being second class citizens under an apartheid system. Can you deny that foreigners receive preferential treatment in Cuba and provide solid proof to that effect?

    Considering how most of the world lives on two bucks or less a day, the $7.50 or so a day the average Cuban makes (which includes free education, free healthcare, subsidized housing) would be making “all Cubans” take a pretty big step back? Is the personal vendetta Miami’s exile Cuba have against Fidel Castro that petty that they would want Cuba to become poorer for the sake of making Cuba “equal” with its global neighbors?

    Youre numbers are wrong. The average cuban makes about $15 a month, a cuban doctor makes about $20. Do the math. And once again you fail to get the point. the point is that Cuba has deteriorated in every sense. Economically, culturally, socially, you name it. And while I do not condone or support the government of Batista, I would be foolish to let my disdain for him blind me from the obvious: Cuba is now a third world country, for the first time in her modern history.

    You can try to make the Cuban issue one about black and white all you like, as fidel castro has so brilliantly done with his usual smoke and mirrors rhetoric, and which you have swallowed so magnificently, but like I mentioned before, for me its not about black and white, nor should it be.

    If you want to help the Cuban people attain the everyday freedoms you and I have: freeedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of the press, freedom to be an individual – you know, basic human rights – then you are more than welcome here. But dont make it a racial issue, because it isnt. And it only detracts from what needs to be done.

    One last thing, every single person on this blog of Cuban origin, regardless of skin color, to “The Man” is still a brown person. Keep that in mind the next time you feel you have to parade that racial chip on your shoulder.

  26. Pablo,

    some links that might interest you about blacks in cuba. There is a lot more if you take the time to search. Have fun.

    http://web.amnesty.org/library/index/ENGAMR250022005
    http://www.fiu.edu/~fcf/blackliberation.html
    http://www.international.blackinformant.com/?p=7
    http://www.newsmax.com/articles/archive/get2.pl?a=2000/6/4/222939
    http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=8943
    http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y03/sep03/22e5.htm
    http://www.cubafreepress.org/art2/cubap000125a.html

    You ask why the animosity between Cubans and Blacks in Miami? Well I as you, why the interest of the Black community to send Elian back to Cuba? To the point of visiting Cuba afterwards and lauding the decision? Why do Blacks hate the Cubans, period?

    Also, go here http://www.cubagov.cu/default.htm

    Now consider this, 70% (more or less) of cuba is Black, yet only 5% of their government is black (3 out of 53). And this is only the ministry council…look up the make up of the military police, and you also get very low percentage of blacks.

  27. Oh, and no the “n” word is not negrito, I wouldn’t have a problem saying that. The N word is a racial despective epithet, that includes two more vocals and two g’s….a word that Blacks today love to use to call each other, and Damon Wayans is even attempting to trademark it for a line of clothing.

  28. Max

    If you wanted some Kool-Aid, all you had to do was ask (I put extra Pahokee sugar in just for you).

    You base your statements on your radical OPINION rather than facts.

    I don’t know about the radical part but if they are, I shared more facts than you did. You still have yet to post anything that supports what you wrote. I posted a url link as well as a Supreme Court case. I also told you how and where you could find additional information referenced in my comments.

    That, for your information, is a fact.

    You “conveniently” sweep under the rug all the well documented evidence of communism and especially Cuba’s barbarity to suit your agenda.

    Not any more convenient than you mentioning “all the well documented evidence” and yet not offering one iota of it here.

    Who’s using opinions, who’s using facts?

    every single person on this blog of Cuban origin, regardless of skin color, to “The Man” is still a brown person. Keep that in mind the next time you feel you have to parade that racial chip on your shoulder.

    “Every”? Does that include ziva and Dave and that charming fellow from Galveston that posts? What about the real Claudia?

    This talking absolutes thing must be contagious. First it was Max and not it is you.

    As far as the “racial chip” and making this into a race thing that element was not only introduced but also set as the fundamental theme of this entire discussion. Let’s be honest with ourselves here: if Carl McGill was not African-American, no one here would be giving a flying flip about his candidacy. It has nothing to do with him being a “democrat” because he is not. Not one democratic party entity is recognizing him as a legitimate candidate while many in republican circles are.

    Want proof, here you go:

    CARL MCGILL FOR CONGRESS ^ | FEB 12, 2006 | CARL MCGILL FOR CONGRESS
    Please support Carl McGill against Maxine Waters by visiting http://www.carlmcgill.com. Carl is a republican who switched parties to go after Waters in a promary. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-campaign2002/t-ca/browse

    QUOTE “As I’ve become more involved in the community, I realized the Democratic Party is not the proper political philosophy for my community.” – Carl McGill “>http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewPrint.asp?Page=%5CPolitics%5Carchive%5C200003%5CPOL20000321e.html
    *I saw this while having breakfast at the Wall Street Cafe

    McGill ran as a republican in 2000
    http://rrcc.co.la.ca.us/elect_results/genov00.ets

    McGill is not the only person trying to unseat the incumbent in that Congressional district
    http://www.politics1.com/ca.htm
    yet it is Carl McGill that has caught the fancy of the exile community as evidenced by, among other things, not one but TWO threads dedicated to the aspirations of the Great Black Hope along with numerous “get the word campaigns” initiated by right-wing elements that are thrilled to see a Black person try to oust another Black person.

    So, so, sooo transparent.

    *As some of you may have already guessed, neither of the other two people in the race (Gordon Mego,
    Paul Ireland) are African-American but this Calle Ocho pep rally is not racial.

    I was one of those with a “Free Nelson mandela” bumper sticker on my car.

    Then you should be familiar with this statement by Mandela:
    “Cuban internationalists have done so much for African independence, freedom, and justice.”

    *Somehow I don’t think he was referring to the Cuban-American pilots hired by the CIA to fly sorties against unarmed villages during Congo’s civil war in the 1960’s.

    How is apartheid bad in Africa and not in Cuba?

    Don’t ask me – ask Mandela:
    http://www.parliament.gov.za/pls/portal30/docs/FOLDER/PARLIAMENTARY_INFORMATION/PUBLICATIONS/FIVE/images/fidel.jpg

    I am familiar with this man’s story. But since you brought him up, the burden is on you to provide whatever data or link you need to support your assertion.

    “Familiar” is being generous. You don’t have a clue about who is this man or what his story is. I’ll do you a favor and post the url link so you can continue the fiction of familiarity:
    http://www.newsreview.com/sacramento/Content?oid=oid%3A44380

    By the way, the man’s name is Cedric Edwards and I did not see anything in that article that gave the impression of Brother Edwards receiving any elite treatment.

    Regarding El Doce, I did not take “a peripheral review” of babalublog. I actually combed through pages and pages looking for any reference to El Doce and I found nothing.

    I even took the advice I gave to Max about his lack of knowledge about Orlando Bosch and this is what I got: “did not match any documents”

    That’s an important part of Cuba’s history like October 10th, 1868 isn’t it?

    dont make it a racial issue, because it isnt. And it only detracts from what needs to be done.

    With all of this attention to Carl McGill (who has never held an public elected office before) and repeated references to Dr. Oscar Biscet (which were not introduced by me) how can you or any one else say that this is not a racial issue? With de facto segregation of Miami (where you can ascertain a person’s skin color based on his/her address with greater accuracy than any other large city in the United States) how can you say it is not racial? With repeated references to how Fidel Castro keeps his prisons filled with Black political prisoners and favors whites in Cuba politically, economically, socially can you say it is not racial? How can anyone “agree” with the statement concering efforts “to win be any means necessary and work on educating the Black voting public about what is really happening in Cuba” (as George did) and say it is not racial? How can anyone know about the origins of the Big 5 country club in SW Dade County and not say any of this is racial? How can anyone look at what forced H. T. Smith et al to launch the aforementioned boycott and not say this is racial?

    What W. E. B. DuBois said about this country one hundred years ago still applies not only to the USA but also to Cuba because both countries were, sadly, built upon the riches brought by the institution of slavery.

    “The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.”

    You deny that, you deny all that is America and Cuba because it was tragically racism that built both countries and it is going to take a lot more than naive and idealistic statements like “We are the world” and “There is no racism” and “I have lots of Black friends” and “I love Prince” and “I don’t have a bigoted bone in my body” and “I only see what is inside of a person” to address and fix the deep-seeded realities of racial and ethnic bias.

    Because people keep unfairly accusing me of not supporting my comments with facts, I will add a few more helpful sources re. the above:

    * Eric Williams’ Capitalism and Slavery
    This book was published while Dr. Williams (later to become first prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago) was employed by the United States Department of State during World War II.

    *Aline Helg’s Our Rightful Share
    This was was published while Dr. Helg was a faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin and is still published via the UT press.

    *Robert Paquette’s Sugar is Made with Blood
    Dr. Paquette is the Publius Virgilius Rogers Professor of History at New York’s Hamilton College.

    *Ada Ferrer’s Insurgent Cuba: Race, Nation, And Revolution, 1868-1898
    Dr. Ferrer is a professor at New York University.

    As sad as the truth is, the truth right now is that if it is not racial, it is not Cuban.

    Hopefully, enough of us can be honest – with each and ourselves – about this truth so that something positive can be done about it.

  29. Val,

    I wanted to thank you for the encouragement to spend more time reading through the archives.

    I took your advice and was rewarded.

    The following was posted by my buddy Max at the beginning of this month:

    Comparing Bosch to Bin Laden? PUUHHLEEESEE.. I am no fan of Bosch necessarily, but at least he was trying to counter a barbaric regime in a way he thought was right.. Bin Laden just killed innocent people, guilty of…. Living in a free society. Crappy comparison.“I don’t know much about Bosch.”

    Oh, and one last thing regarding your claim that “Bin Laden just killed innocent people, guilty of…. Living in a free society.”

    According to Michael Scheuer, the man who founded the CIA’s bin Laden unit a decade ago,

    “The real root of their opposition is what we do in the Islamic world. If they were hating us because we had elections, or gender equality, or liberty, they would be a lethal nuisance, but they wouldn’t be a threat to our security. If you remember, the Ayatollah tried waging a jihad against Americans because we were degenerate—we had X-rated movies, we drank liquor, women were in workplaces. Very, very few people were willing to die for that kind of thing. Bin Laden, I think, took a lesson from that and instead focused on the impact of our policies in the Islamic world—our support for the Arab tyrannies in Saudi Arabia and Egypt, our presence in the holy lands on the Arabian Peninsula, our invasion of Iraq, our support for countries like Russia that are deemed to repress Islamic people. He’s focused on things that are visible to the Islamic world every day, and quite frankly there’s a direct correlation between what he says and what all the Western polling firms are finding, that there is a huge majority in Islamic countries that hate our foreign policy. And yet generally, every one of the same countries has a majority, sometimes a large one, that admires the way Americans live, the basic equity of our society.

    We should be so lucky as to have him hate us only for our freedoms. He’s never even discussed that kind of thing.

  30. hassan Pablo,

    yet it is Carl McGill that has caught the fancy of the exile community as evidenced by, among other things, not one but TWO threads dedicated to the aspirations of the Great Black Hope along with numerous “get the word campaigns” initiated by right-wing elements that are thrilled to see a Black person try to oust another Black person.

    I believe this is a bipartisan show support of one candidate over another candidate who is a fidelista. Had McGill been a whitebread red neck and still showed his support for Cuba, running against another whitebread redneck wholoves fidel, the supprt would have been for the challeneger as well. It is YOU that is making this a racial issue. You and none other than you.

    Then you should be familiar with this statement by Mandela:
    “Cuban internationalists have done so much for African independence, freedom, and justice.”

    What does that statement by a hypocrite have to do with apartheid PRESENT NOW in Cuba? Dont avoid the question by sidestepping. Either address it honestly, or shut the hell up.

    Don’t ask me – ask Mandela:

    Im not asking Mandela, it is established that he is a hypocrite already. i want you to answer the question. You.

    “Familiar” is being generous. You don’t have a clue about who is this man or what his story is. I’ll do you a favor and post the url link so you can continue the fiction of familiarity:

    Since you posted the link, you may as well take th etime to read it. there are a few quotes there that make my point exactly.

    By the way, the man’s name is Cedric Edwards and I did not see anything in that article that gave the impression of Brother Edwards receiving any elite treatment.

    Oh really? for starters, how many Cuban nationals have full access to the internet?

    With all of this attention to Carl McGill (who has never held an public elected office before) and repeated references to Dr. Oscar Biscet (which were not introduced by me) how can you or any one else say that this is not a racial issue? With de facto segregation of Miami (where you can ascertain a person’s skin color based on his/her address with greater accuracy than any other large city in the United States) how can you say it is not racial? With repeated references to how Fidel Castro keeps his prisons filled with Black political prisoners and favors whites in Cuba politically, economically, socially can you say it is not racial? How can anyone “agree” with the statement concering efforts “to win be any means necessary and work on educating the Black voting public about what is really happening in Cuba” (as George did) and say it is not racial? How can anyone know about the origins of the Big 5 country club in SW Dade County and not say any of this is racial? How can anyone look at what forced H. T. Smith et al to launch the aforementioned boycott and not say this is racial?

    All the comments here on Biscet and black Cuban vs black american and all that were made because YOU opened the race door and then continued playing pre-manufactured the race card until now.

    But it stops right here.

    Lets cut to the chase: DO YOU SUPPORT THE GOVERNMENT OF FIDEL CASTRO?

    DO YOU SUPPORT THE APARTHEID SYSTEM IN PLACE IN CUBA?

    DO YOU SUPPORT THE MISTREATMENT OF DISSIDENTS AND JOURNALISTS IN CUBA AND THE ENCARCERATION OF SAME?

    DO YOU SUPPORT THE INFORMATION BLOCKADE AGAINSTTHE CUBAN PEOPLE BY THE CUBAN GOVERNMENT?

    DO YOU SUPPORT THE MISRESPRESENTATION OF BLACK CUBANS WITHIN THE CUBAN GOVERNMENT?

    I suspect, pablo, if that truly is your name, that you are more concerned with inciting controversy than with reasoned debate. That you are more concerned with making one side look bad, while completely ignoring and worse, helping supress the information detritus to the other side.

    We have a word for that in Cuban:

    ?angara.

  31. This is a TROLL of the worst kind.

    I am afraid that Pablo (or whatever his name REALLY is) will counter with bullcrap like dissidents in the USA (tee hee!!) or his perception of my opinion on Bosch or how Mexicans enter the US for the same reasons as Cubans.

    Pablo, you did not come here for “intelligent” or “mature” discourse as you claim. But to slander and dissiminate false information only to further your agenda.

    Pablo also stated the reasons for the Cubans seeking refuge in the United States is because Cuba is poor and the United States is Rich.

    Well, how did the United States get rich? How did Cuba get poor? I don’t recall Cubans risking their lives through shark infested waters prior to Fidel..

    Furthermore, did the United States become a beacon of freedom and prosperity via communism/socialism? Of course not.

    Cuba had a standard of living second to only the United States and maybe Argentina prior to the current regime (source the UN – you can look it up)

    Now it is on par with Haiti. You have no answer for the truth and facts.

  32. Hey Pablo, (or whatever your name is)

    Thanks for proving Val’s and my point. You are a Fidelista and your sole purpose is a feeble attempt to discredit Cuban Americans and prop up a barbaric communist system.

    While Mandela’s stand against apartheid is to be applauded, his behavior in supporting a regime that supports aparthied against its own people.
    So Mandela in this aspect was, and probably still is, a hypocrite.

    There are many documented cases of those that spent years and years in Cuba, maybe more than Mandela simply for their beliefs.

    Anyway, in spite of the OVERWHELMING evidence presented to you (its already there, your REFUSAL to acknowledge it is YOUR problem), you still choose to parrot the regime’s stance.

    You have never been to Cuba, you really have no first hand knowledge of Cuba except from what you have heard from “Afrocubaweb” and other entities that only serve as propaganda pieces for the regime and the extreme left.

    So where does the “3 strikes and you’re out” ONLY apply to blacks?

    What “strikes” are you talking about? Armed robbery? Rape? Murder?

    I want you to read a book called “Against all hope” by Armando Valladares. He puts Mandela to shame.

    Oh, that’s right – you’re a liar that claims to be for “honest, mature…blah, blah, blah.. conversation..(hahahaha)

    Spare us the bull

  33. Roxbury? What or who the heck is Roxbury?

    When on earth was Fidel Castro EVER DEMOCRATICALLY elected, or “picked by the people” for you to draw the comparison with Bush? Fidel Castro promised elections which he never held. http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/check/media/video/otdvideo/59/01/01/7351_01-01-59?size=4×3&bgc=6699CC&nbram=1&nbram=1&bbram=1&news=1

    I see you chose to ignore the links I provided you so Max is right, you choose not to see, and that is your problem. He’s right on another thing, you should definitely read “Against all Hope”

    Why so many Cubans don’t go? Well if they did, and attempted some type of action, then again they would be terrorists, now wouldn’t they? The dissidents in Cuba are a brave bunch, and a peaceful one, yet they keep being harassed and their actions ignored – even when they’ve tried to fit them alongside of the Cuban constitution outlines.

    As for access to the internet, Cubans are denied that. In fact there is currently an independent journalist on hunger strike b/c he has been denied access to the internet. Only a few privileged in Cuba have access to the internet, like everything else…but wait, isn’t that apartheid?

    Oh and one more thing, how dare you presume what we would’ve or wouldn’t have done? Who the hell are you to even pressume you know us, or our dedication to our cause?

    You come here with the sole purpose of putting us down, and attempting to throw down our arguments, and you have just proven that.

    Why the interest on something that happened on 1912? Was Cuba the only place where this happened? Didn’t the Spanish kill off the Indians? Are you complaining about that too? Besides, wansn’t it you complaining about making this a race thing, when you were the very one that made it a race thing?

    I find it very interesting how you come here, into a post about a political candidate against Maxine Waters who happens to be black, and start accusing everyone on the site of being racist? jeez, i never knew supporting a candidate, who happens to be black, was being racist.

    I believe you are the prejudiced one. And if you are black, then you are prejudiced against white. Prejudice, is prejudice, and there is nothing written that in only happens in one specific way. You came here rattling the cage about race, and you’ve kept at it through all your posts.

    Val asked you a bunch of questions I just have one which you haven’t asnwered?

    DO YOU SUPPORT FIDEL CASTRO AND HIS REGIME? Understand this as are you PRO FIDEL or ANTI FIDEL? DO YOU WANT A DEMOCRACY IN CUBA OR YOU THINK THEY ARE FINE AS IS?

    If you so much love and respect Cuba, its revolution, and want to defend the rights of Cuban blacks, why dont YOU move to cuba and practice what you preach?

  34. folks,

    To back up La Ventanita’s claim of Cuban’s lack of internet access, I was involved as a consultant some years ago with a THE Spanish telecommunications company. They were engaged in a project in Cuba installing internet access in the tourist areas of Havana.

    The telecommunications commpany (which will remain nameless) was PROHIBITED by the Cuban government from allowing access anywhere else but the hotels. Apartheid, first hand!!

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