Thank you again, SCOTUS

“Government can’t squelch free speech” by Matt Welch:

Let’s boil it down to the essential words: Political documentary, banned, government.

You don’t have to be a First Amendment purist to intuit that political speech was, if anything, the most urgent subcategory covered by the First Amendment’s “Congress shall pass no law” restrictions. And you don’t have to be a Hillary-hater to imagine the shoe on the other foot. What if MoveOn.org’s 501(c)(4), Campaign to Defend America, had been blocked by George W. Bush’s Federal Elections Commission from broadcasting “McCain: The Movie”? Wouldn’t that stink, too?

As Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in his majority opinion, “The law before us is an outright ban, backed by criminal sanctions. Section 441b makes it a felony for all corporations — including nonprofit advocacy corporations — either to expressly advocate the election or defeat of candidates or to broadcast electioneering communications within 30 days of a primary election and 60 days of a general election. … If the First Amendment has any force, it prohibits Congress from fining or jailing citizens, or associations of citizens, for simply engaging in political speech.”

You see, it’s there in black and white: unconscionable penalties (just like in the health care bill) that expose who and what the “progressives”really are.

I have to laugh at the gyrations the libs and “progressives” are doing in slamming this decision. I wonder how their reaction would be if one of their organizations was banned by the FEC from releasing a documentary decrying the evil of conservatives…

3 thoughts on “Thank you again, SCOTUS”

  1. Campaign finance reform and the ponderous legal code used to enforce it were always a smokescreen designed to focus our gaze upon how much money is donated to campaigns or on behalf of them while concealing the real threat to democracy–what the money buys.

    Perhaps now we can begin a meaningful discussion of corporate welfare, especially its bread-and-butter provisions within the tax code.

    Thank you SCOTUS.

  2. While I don’t agree with the decision (I have my own view on candidate finances that I will not go into here) I do find it laughable that if the Dems had not pushed the Hillary movie issue so far, they wouldn’t have gotten this reversal. They are all in upheaval about the corporate funding of candidates, and they cannot take the fact that it is their own fault. Serves them right.

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