Eighteen companies will join Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue on June 6-8 business mission aimed at boosting the state’s exports to Cuba.


Be sure to smile at ceiling fan, Governor Perdue! And speak loudly and clearly into the bathroom faucet!”

(Oye pero este Bloqueo esta del CARAJO!)

In 2000, Congress authorized food and medicine sales to Cuba, and since then, U.S. exporters sold an average of $350 million a year in food to the island. U.S. food sales to Cuba peaked in 2008 at about $700 million.

5 thoughts on “Eighteen companies will join Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue on June 6-8 business mission aimed at boosting the state’s exports to Cuba.”

  1. I can’t decide whether this yahoo looks more like a used-car salesman or some inbred hillbilly from “Deliverance.” Oh, now I get it, this is the Dixie version of Spain’s Moratinos. But of course.

  2. If the article Humberto linked to is incorrect in its assertions, then interested parties (e.g. Babalu readers) really should demand a correction.

    U.S. food sales to Cuba peaked in 2008 at about $700 million.

    But then they fell to $528 million in 2009, and fell another 60 percent in the first quarter of 2010. This drop can largely be attributed to Cuba’s liquidity crunch during the worldwide economic downturn. But there are other important factors at play, and they emanate from Washington, not Havana.

    The embargo prohibits U.S. government or private institutions from providing any credits for these food sales, and so Cuba must pay either by “cash in advance” or get a foreign bank letter of credit to transact payment. The embargo also requires Cuban payments to be routed through a third country bank. In 2005, Washington made these strict conditions even tougher when they redefined “in advance” so narrowly as to kill all the cash-based sales. Each of these restrictions makes U.S. exporters less competitive in what should be a natural market for the United States.

  3. When it comes to $$$ – many RINO republicans are just as willing to sell out Cuba’s freedom struggle. 🙁

  4. Mr. Mojito Fan, “Each of these restrictions makes U.S. exporters less competitive in what should be a natural market for the United States.”

    Oh, so is that your concern? Is it all about the market? As you say, Cuba should be a natural market for the United States. Before the castro “revolution” it was, and I wonder what exactly you consider to be the current deterrent to that “normal market.”

    Cuba is a totalitarian state controlled dictatorship who just happens to owe billions of dollars to the USA for properties expropriated early in the “revolution” when castro seized power. Also, Cuba does not pay its bills, and currently is arrears in payments to every country world wide that it owes money to. So you honestly believe that we should have normal trade relations with this murderous aberration masquerading as a legitimate government?

    I have to ask you, exactly what was your point? Are you wondering why Cuba is not willing to spend as much on food for Cubans because the regimes profit margin is down? Sorry we all know this. You do know, that all food imported by castro inc., is sold for profit in Cuba, with you know who pocketing the profits.
    And don’t even mention the free health care and ration card. Cubans pay, in hard labor, family separations, blood, repression, and persecution for every goddamn scrap their slave masters toss their way.

  5. Ziva, in case it was not clear, those words you quoted were not my words … I was quoting from the article Humberto linked to.

    I thought my point was obvious. Let me repeat, if the article is incorrect then people should call the newspaper on it.

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