How good are things in Raul Castro’s Cuba?

So how good are things in Raul Castro’s Cuba? Listening to the media and “Cuba Experts,” things are just peachy. So peachy, in fact, that over 140,000 Cubans have applied for Spanish citizenship in order to escape their island paradise, with 60,000 of them already obtaining it.

Via Café Fuerte (my translation):

More than 60,000 Cubans have obtained Spanish citizenship

http://cafefuerte.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/embajadacuba-display.jpg
Spanish embassy in Havana

BY WILFREDO CANCIO ISLA

– Some 140,000 Cubans have applied for Spanish citizenship under the protection of the Historic Memorial Law, and more than 60,000 of these applications have already been approved according to diplomatic sources in Havana.

“In reality, it has been a fluid process, and very few applications have been denied,” said a Spanish consular official at the Spanish embassy to Café Fuerte.

The source confirmed that so far approximately 140,000 Cubans have applied for Spanish citizen ship under the legislation approved in 2007 and popularly referred to as “The Law of the Grandchildren.”

5 thoughts on “How good are things in Raul Castro’s Cuba?”

  1. Imagine tens of thousands of Americans clamoring for Irish, Italian and Polish citizenship…same principle here. Spaniards used to be as desperate to enter Cuba as the above Europeans were to enter the U.S.

    Unreal

  2. Here is Spain’s forgotten legacy in Cuba
    http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/reconcentrado.htm
    After 1898 we let the Spaniards stay on the island and continue control the economy. In contrast, the U.S. after independence confiscated all Loyalist and Tory property and expelled them.
    Then in 1910, Cuba opened massive immigration to the Spaniards who had oppressed them, allowing Angel Castro Argiz back onto the island after having been a murderous soldier.
    Finally, in the 1940s, many Spanish Communists fleeing Franco were allowed into Cuba and received government sinecures. A decade later, they helped Castro seize power.

  3. Hell, they’d appy for anything that could get them out of Cuba. That’s the real issue, especially for the young or not too old, getting OUT. For those that can’t leave, the issue is getting whatever they can from abroad, either directly or indirectly. In any case, they’re looking OUTSIDE, not internally. Many if not most of these people only know Cuba as a totalitarian hellhole and miserable failure, and they think it can’t be fixed or that it’s not worth what it would take to fix it. To use real estate terminology, they do NOT want a fixer-upper; they want something they can move into that’s totally functional and ready as is, with no significant issues. Spain is not in the best shape these days, but practically anywhere in the free world looks much better than Cuba, and I expect Spain is seen as a way station en route to the US.

  4. Any non-tainted and impartial analysis of Cuba can only come to the fair conclusion that castro has been an unmitigated disaster, a tsunami of unparalleled proportions, to Cuba in all aspects, politically, economically, culturally, environmentally, architecturally, etc..but one aspect that has not really been explored [perhaps because of the politically incorrect nature of such an analysis] is the massive demographic change in Cuba’s racial make-up. As soon as castro usurped Cuba’s presidency, you had all European migration to Cuba cease, then you had hundreds of thousands of Euro-Cubans leave and now another good part of the remaining Euro-Cubans are leaving.

    When this nightmare is finally over one day [and I won’t speculate how much longer it is going to last], Cuba is going to be totally unrecognizable.

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